iqpogoyj

Letters to the Editor for Monday, Jan. 27

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionWestinghouse long overdue for a statueTrains were crashing. Brakemen on moving cars were losing life and limbs, until 22-year-old George Westinghouse, in 1868, invented an ingenious system.It allowed the engineer with a lever to safely apply brakes to all cars. The Westinghouse Air Brake remains the global standard.George Westinghouse grew up in Schenectady. He learned invention, manufacturing and marketing in the family Westinghouse Agricultural Works. He served as a shipboard engineer during the Civil War, attended Union College and launched a career with 300 patents and creation of 60 companies. He was scrupulously honest and fair with admiring employees.After Thomas Edison invented the electric light in 1879, he provided DC electricity to nearby customers. George Westinghouse designed lighting for Chicago World’s Fair and an AC system.It transferred high voltage electricity over long distances, starting with Niagara Falls to Buffalo. Westinghouse current continues to power the world.Analyzing the Westinghouse transformer-based AC system required new mathematics, for which Charles Steinmetz gained fame as the Wizard of Schenectady. He also created the electrical engineering program at Union College.Citizen Brian Merriam self-initiated nicely lighted statues of Thomas Edison and Charles Steinmetz on Erie Boulevard, with sponsorship by the Chamber of Commerce. Brian is now leading a team for a George Westinghouse statue for the empty adjacent plaza. A small portion of the Downtown Revitalization Initiative funding can make it an overdue reality.Frank WicksSchenectadyCome together to help pensionersIn the normal stimulus and response of life, there is a generally held convention that one good deed deserves another. Those who give help in a time of need deserve help if the tables turn.It is, therefore, time for the people of Schenectady to recognize and support the 1,100 retires of Saint Clare’s Hospital who served this community for decades and are now in need of help themselves.Over one year ago, they were informed that their retirement fund had failed and that they would not be receiving their pensions.As a result of the pension fund failure, the retires are now enduring severe financial hardships.Many are experiencing limitations to medical care and even nutrition. Some have died waiting for a resolution to this pension tragedy. Unfortunately, the search for a solution to this terrible problem has no end in sight.There are many and complex reasons for this catastrophic situation. However, one thing is certain: the retirees of St. Clare’s Hospital are not responsible for the failure of their pension fund.Every individual citizen, service group, fraternal organization and church group should speak out and demand that Gov. Andrew Cuomo, our legislators, church leaders and former fund managers come together to find a solution to this unnecessary suffering.Apathy in this situation is not an option. We, the citizens of Schenectady, are either part of the solution or we are part of the problem.William M. Vacca, MDNiskayunaThe writer is former chief of medicine at St. Clare’s Hospital.Inaction on climate will make it worseI am a volunteer for Citizens Climate Lobby, a nonprofit organization devoted to addressing the issue of climate change.With so many of the recent climate-related stories pointing to the worsening of climate change around the world (the brush fires in Australia, record heat in parts of Europe, the rapidly accelerating melting of large glaciers — just to name a few), it can be frightening to turn on the news nowadays. In fact, with some climate scientists saying that the worst effects of climate change cannot be avoided no matter what steps we take to address the problem, it can be tempting to ask the question, “Why bother if there is no hope?”Even if the worst effects of catastrophic climate change seem likely, doing nothing is simply not an option.Just about any step we take to mitigate the worsening of carbon dioxide levels or the rise of global temperatures would be beneficial for our children and grandchildren. The air would be cleaner, storms would be less severe, diseases would not spread as quickly, and world economies would not be crippled as quickly. If these seem only like holding actions, maybe so. But you never know when the political will to take effective corrective action will emerge or when new technologies might give us renewed hope. We simply cannot allow our planet to deteriorate unchecked. Doing nothing is not an option.Ross LenetGuilderland Use caution when visiting MontrealJust a heads up to those traveling to Montreal, Canada.My daughter and I traveled to Montreal recently and parked in an outside small parking site in Old Montreal.Unfortunately, while seeing Notre Dame and having lunch in a very busy area with lots of people walking around and high rises all around us, her Jeep truck was broken into by the back-passenger window. An iPad, very expensive camera, insulin and other medicines were stolen.City police came, and we have a number of the incident. We went to Home Depot and bought tape and plastic to fix the window.Upon leaving Canada, talking with the officer at the New York border, we told him what took place in Old Montreal. He stated to us that it happens all the time and that Canadians are targeting trucks and New York State vehicles. Yes, we should have booked our hotel and dropped off everything first (lesson learned) and then proceeded to our venture in Old Montreal. It has been suggested that you rent a car if you are going to Canada, especially Montreal, by border patrols. Take heed all. It really spoiled our weekend and has left me feeling very angry.Deborah BowdishSchenectadyCuomo doesn’t care about New YorkersGov. Andrew Cuomo should stay in Puerto Rico and take the Democrats with him (Assembly and Senate). They can have full control there. The laws that are being passed in New York are so far of the rail that they’re killing this state.He should have never gotten a third term; you talk about obstruction and abuse of power. Instead of taking care of this state’s needs, our tax dollars are going elsewhere. New York was once a leader of industrial states, and our ports were doing well with imports and exports. Even the Port of Albany was doing well.Our economy was high due to construction, factories like GE, Ford, Bendix, Barkley Home products, Alco products, Bear Manning, paper mills, CDTA, taxi companies, downtown stores, Sears, Woolworth, Rudnick’s, outlets, soda shops for kids, Ellis Hospital, St. Clare’s Hospital, Bellview Hospital, carpet mills, auto dealerships, etc.What do we have today? Nothing. Cuomo doesn’t care if we have jobs or safety for our kids in school or for a safe state.He lets criminals out of jail to repeat their crimes and wants to disarm the law-abiding citizen.Would you say he has a mental capacity to be a leader? I don’t think so. All of the hunters in this state supported conservation when they bought a firearm, ammo for hunting, target- and competitive shooting. Without the hunters, who is going to take care of our wild animals and keep our woods safe?Claude Rizzicone, Jr.SchenectadyAlbany Civic Theater deserves coverageThe Gazette proclaims itself to be “The Voice of the Capital Region.”Albany has a major role in there being a Capital Region.Albany Civic Theater is in Albany, but The Gazette is too busy, understaffed or whatever else their excuse is for not reviewing Albany Civic Theater’s performances.Consider that Albany Civic Theater has already presented two terrific shows this season.Another, “American Soldiers” coming up starting Jan. 31.Will The Gazette find another excuse for passing on this Albany Civic Theater play, too?John DanielsDuanesburg More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Make a game plan for voting. Do it now.HIGH NOTES: PPEs, fighting hunger, backpacks and supplies for kidsEDITORIAL: No chickens in city without strong regsFoss: Schenectady homeless assistance program Street Soldiers dealing with surge in needlast_img read more

zqqfcfkf

Cable company moves to Research Park

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

zqqfcfkf

Industrial Comment Timing for success

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

iwydsxxl

Niche market

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

rplnxbfy

BPF seeks closer ties and a united voice

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

rderjifl

Offices: Steady as she goes

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

rsoibnmn

Up to speed

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

rplnxbfy

68 returnees from China self-quarantined in North Sumatra

first_imgSixty-eight people that have just returned from China are undergoing self-quarantine in their homes for 14 days in North Sumatra to prevent a potential coronavirus outbreak.The Medan Port Health Authority’s (KKP) quarantine control head, Rahmad Ramadhan Nasution, told The Jakarta Post on Tuesday that foreign nationals were among the returnees and were under observation by health agencies in the province.“All 68 people are spread in several regions in North Sumatra. They have signed an agreement to conduct self-quarantine and to always use medical masks,” Rahmad said. Read also: Indonesian reporter and family in self-imposed quarantine upon return from China“It could be daily, twice a day, or once a week depending on the requirements,” he said.He also urged the public to remain calm as the self-quarantined returnees were said to be in good condition.While no coronavirus infection has been reported in Indonesia, health experts have expressed concern over the possibility of undetected cases in the country.A recent study conducted by researchers at Harvard University has suggested that Indonesia should have confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus already, considering the high air travel volume from Wuhan, the epicenter of the outbreak in China, to the country.The study, carried out by researchers at the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, revealed that Indonesia’s zero confirmed cases “may suggest the potential for undetected cases in these locations given the expected connection before travel control measures were implemented”.However, the study has not been peer-reviewed. It was published on pre-print server medRxiv on Feb. 5.The ministry has repeatedly brushed off these concerns. Its communicable disease prevention and control director, Wiendra Waworuntu, said Indonesia had learned from its previous encounters with outbreaks, including the 2002-2003 SARS outbreak. (mpr)Topics : The new coronavirus has infected more than 42,000 people and killed more than 1,000 on mainland China, overtaking global fatalities in the 2002-03 Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) epidemic. Cases have also been reported in two dozen other countries.North Sumatra Health Agency head Alwi Mujahit Hasibuan said the returnees must remain in their own houses for 14 days and were being monitored by the agency and the KKP.“We’ll observe them for 14 days and in the meantime, they’re prohibited from leaving their homes,” he said.He added that during the observation period, the agency and the KKP could dispatch a team to monitor the returnees’ health development at any time.last_img read more

beuvhwmp

Pope Francis may lead Mass in Jakarta during September visit to Indonesia

first_imgBesides leading a mass, Suharyo said the Pope would be expected to visit the Istiqlal Mosque and to meet with President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo, as well as with bishops, priests and nuns at the Jakarta Cathedral.The secretary-general of the supreme council of Indonesia’s largest Islamic group Nahdlatul Ulama (NU), Yahya Cholil Staquf, revealed last month that Pope Francis planned to visit Indonesia, as well as neighboring Timor Leste and Papua New Guinea, in September.The Muslim scholar announced the plan following his meeting with Francis in Rome on Jan. 15.Pope Francis has recently paid successful visits to Thailand and Japan and previously expressed interest in visiting Indonesia this year.  Pope Francis may preside over a mass at the Gelora Bung Karno main stadium in Senayan, Central Jakarta, during his expected visit to Indonesia in September, the Indonesian Bishops Conference (KWI) announced.KWI chairman and Indonesia’s third cardinal, Ignatius Suharyo, said there was a possibility the supreme leader of the world’s Catholic Church would lead a mass at the sport complex, although the schedule was still under discussion.“There is a possibility. The Vatican team plans to come to Indonesia in late March and the official announcement of the Pope’s schedule and activities will be announced after that,” Suharyo told The Jakarta Post on Friday. Read also: NU cleric meets Pope Francis, talks ‘social activism’ in Rome to address interfaith conflictsThe State Palace and the Foreign Ministry both confirmed in late January that upon learning Pope Francis’ wishes, Jokowi extended an official invitation to him to visit the archipelago.Vatican-linked ucanews.com reported on Friday that Francis has fallen sick in Rome, a day after attending Ash Wednesday ceremonies without wearing a mask in an expression of solidarity with those suffering from the COVID-19 coronavirus. Whether the Pope has been tested for the coronavirus remains unclear. The pope’s expected visit to Indonesia this year would convey a message of hope and peace for some 7 million Catholics and other religious followers in the world’s largest Muslim-populated country.Pope Francis had made clear his reformist position against sexual violence in the Catholic Church globally as stated in his apostolic letter Vos Estis Lux Mundi issued in May last year.His visit, if it happens, would mark the third time a Catholic pope has come to Indonesia.Pope Paul VI made a short visit to Jakarta in 1970, followed by John Paul II in 1989. During his eight-day visit, John Paul II also visited Timor Leste, at that time known as East Timor since it was still under Indonesia’s administration.Topics :last_img read more

chfxoosc

Taliban fought IS with ‘limited’ US military support, US general reveals

first_imgHe was called to testify about the situation in Afghanistan following a peace deal that the United States signed with the Taliban February 29 in Doha.Under the agreement, the United States committed to the withdrawal of all foreign fores within 14 months in return for a Taliban pledge to tackle jihadists such as the Islamic State group and Al-Qaeda, and hold peace talks with the Afghan government.”Over the last several months in eastern Afghanistan we’ve watched the Taliban compress and crush the ISIS presence on the ground in southern Nangarhar province, and they’ve been very effective doing that,” McKenzie said, using an alternate acronym for Islamic State.”There was very limited support from us,” he said, without elaborating further on the role US forces played. “They have demonstrated a capability to do it. It was a bloody mess, but they did it,” the US general said. “ISIS really now no longer holds ground in Nangarhar province.”McKenzie, however, said he was “less optimistic” about the Taliban taking on Al-Qaeda, the jihadists who plotted the September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States from their base in then Taliban-ruled Afghanistan.”That’s something they’re going to have to demonstrate that has not yet been demonstrated,” McKenzie said.McKenzie reminded lawmakers that the Taliban must meet its commitments for there to be a withdrawal.”We don’t need to trust them, we don’t need to like them, we don’t need to believe anything they say, we need to observe what they do,” McKenzie said.McKenzie said that the US military has yet to prepare a military plan for a total withdrawal from Afghanistan.Topics : The Taliban has shown that it can fight and defeat Islamic State group jihadists in Afghanistan, a top US general said Tuesday, revealing for the first time that it had done so in recent months with “very limited” US military support.”It was a bloody mess, but they did it,” General Kenneth McKenzie, head of the US Central Command, said of the Taliban’s virtual defeat of IS in Afghanistan’s Nangarhar province in recent months.McKenzie disclosed the US military support for the Taliban operation in congressional testimony, but provided few details on the role played by US forces.last_img read more