fofabvlic

Harvard partners with national labs on quantum computing

first_img Harvard Quantum Initiative Co-Director Lukin on ‘quantum supremacy’ and Google’s announcement of its achievement Harvard’s quantum leap Toward an unhackable quantum internet Riding the quantum computing ‘wave’ Researchers demonstrate the missing link for a quantum internet As quantum science and engineering come into their own, co-directors of new initiative say anything is possible “We are doing the basic research into a new quantum-computing platform — individually controlled arrays of single molecules,” said Doyle. “This new center will seed our ideas into other areas of research as we, in turn, learn about new developments made with other quantum platforms. I’m so thankful for all the hard work from people in the Harvard Quantum Initiative who made it possible for us to be part of this center.”Doyle and Lukin will be working with Markus Greiner, also a George Vasmer Leverett Professor of Physics, and Kang-Kuen Ni, the Morris Kahn Associate Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology and of Physics, on this project.The Quantum Science Center, led by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory outside Knoxville, Tenn., likewise will receive $115 million over five years to develop topological quantum materials for manipulating, transferring, and storing information, and transition this knowledge to the private sector for use in practical applications such as quantum computers and sensors.Amir Yacoby, professor of physics and of applied physics, will lead one of the research directions focused on developing new approaches for sensing quantum matter. Prineha Narang, assistant professor of computational materials science at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), is also a member of this research team.Yacoby and Narang’s work will focus on using quantum sensing techniques to explore quantum materials. Quantum materials exhibit exotic and often mind-boggling properties, such as quantum fluctuations, quantum entanglement, quantum coherence, and topological behavior. These materials could be powerful platforms for quantum technologies — if researchers can understand and harness their underlying properties. Yacoby and Narang plan to use superconducting circuits and magnonic excitations to find new ways to explore these powerful materials on the mesoscale.“The Quantum Science Center is about transforming typically fragile quantum states into resilient, controllable, and scalable quantum systems in order to realize the promise of quantum technologies,” said Narang. “It’s an incredible team of people, and I’m super excited to not only partner with Oak Ridge National Lab over the next five years but also to forge relationships with the industry partners, particularly Microsoft and IBM, who will be crucial to translate our fundamental work into technology.”The Co-Design Center for Quantum Advantage, headquartered at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, N.Y., on Long Island, will receive $115 million over five years to develop materials, devices, software, and applications that will serve as a platform for the next generation of quantum computing capabilities. The goal is to overcome the limitations of today’s early stage quantum computers and propel the field forward to unlock new capabilities to tackle real-world challenges.Yacoby is a member of a research team that is focusing on developing a multi-probe scan system for exploring quantum materials and, in particular, superconducting qubits.“These research centers will allow us to develop new methodologies to unravel hidden properties of quantum materials,” said Yacoby. “In turn, these new material properties will lead to new quantum technologies with unprecedented capabilities.”The DOE also announced that Evelyn L. Hu, the Tarr-Coyne Professor of Electrical Engineering and Applied Science at SEAS and co-director of the Harvard Quantum Initiative, will sit on the National Quantum Initiative Advisory Committee (NQIAC), which will counsel the White House on QIS policy.“I am tremendously honored to be part of the NQIAC, to be able to work with outstanding colleagues to help guide a national policy in this transformative area of science technology,” Hu said. “I hope to serve as a conduit of information between perspectives at the national level and the wealth of exciting quantum activities at Harvard and the Boston area.”In addition to the DOE-funded QIS research centers, Harvard quantum engineers and scientists are involved in several other new quantum centers and institutes funded by the National Science Foundation. Lukin, Narang, and Marko Lončar, the Tiantsai Lin Professor of Electrical Engineering at SEAS, are PIs in the recently announced Engineering Research Center for Quantum Networks (CQN), headquartered at the University of Arizona in Tucson. CQN aims to create foundations for the future quantum internet by developing key technologies and new functional building blocks connecting quantum processors over local and global scales.Doyle and Susanne Yelin, professor in residence at the Department of Physics, will serve as co-PIs in the newly launched NSF Quantum Leap Challenge Institute for Enhanced Sensing and Distribution Using Correlated Quantum States. This institute, led by the University of Colorado in Boulder, will design, build, and employ quantum sensing technology for a variety of applications in precision measurement.“These funded centers are important steps toward stronger collaboration between leading academic groups, national labs, and industry in this rapidly developing field,” said Lukin. “We at Harvard are looking forward to extending and broadening these engagements that will benefit science, technology, and society.” Harvard scientists will take leading roles in a new federal government effort to advance quantum computing, an experimental technology that could make it possible to perform calculations at speeds inconceivable today and usher in game-changing innovations in medicine, artificial intelligence, drug development, and other fields.The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced last week the creation of five new Quantum Information Science (QIS) Research Centers across the country. These centers, led by DOE national laboratories, will be part of the U.S. National Quantum Initiative.The DOE awarded $625 million over five years to the Argonne, Brookhaven, Fermi, Oak Ridge, and Lawrence Berkeley national laboratories to establish centers. Each facility will have an interdisciplinary research team and multiple partner institutions. Harvard researchers will play important roles in the centers at Brookhaven, Oak Ridge, and Lawrence Berkeley.“This very welcome federal investment in QIS Research Centers will catalyze advances in one of the most exciting areas of science today. Nobody who knows their work will be surprised to see the prominent roles that Harvard scientists and engineers, each one of them a leading innovator in quantum science, will play in the new centers,” said Provost Alan M. Garber. “I look forward to seeing the results of their research, which promises to help shape the future of computation and data science.”The Quantum Systems Accelerator (QSA) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) in Alameda County, just north of the University of California, Berkeley, was awarded $115 million over five years to develop the solutions needed to build working quantum systems, which harness the power of quantum mechanics.Mikhail Lukin, a George Vasmer Leverett Professor of Physics and co-director of the Harvard Quantum Initiative, is project leader of one of the QSA’s major research thrusts: algorithms and applications. Lukin and his team will investigate how quantum computers can meaningfully speed up answers to real-world scientific problems and create new tools to quantify this advantage and performance.“Within this project, DOE labs partner with leading academic research groups from across the country to address some of the most important challenges in the field of quantum information science: building useful quantum systems, and working together toward the exciting goal of realizing new applications that are out of reach for the most powerful classical computers,” Lukin said.John Doyle, the Henry B. Silsbee Professor of Physics and co-director of the Harvard Quantum Initiative, is also a primary investigator (PI) at the center. His research will focus on creating programmable arrays of single molecules for use in quantum computing and simulations. The arrays can realize several different types of simulations and computations, with each molecule acting as a single qubit, the much more powerful quantum version of a classical computer bit. Relatedlast_img read more

fofabvlic

‘Gardening’ bargains

first_imgBargain plantsOn the July 13 show, Reeves shows how to prune an azalea’s top growth to make a compact plant that, properly planted, can be a low-cost bonus in your landscape.”Gardening in Georgia” is produced by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and GPTV. It airs twice each Saturday, at noon and 7 p.m.Reeves demonstrates, too, how to make a tuteur out of an tomato cage and long privet limbs. Small vines like clematis are well suited for a small, upright structure like this. It’s an example of how a bad plant like privet can do a good deed in your garden.Griffin vegetable patchThe show then shifts to the Research and Education Garden vegetable patch on the UGA campus in Griffin, Ga. Master Gardener Jerry Robinson and horticulturist Tony Johnson constantly evaluate plant varieties, mulching practices, bed design and other management methods in this garden.Finally, Reeves introduces some members of the Quercus family, commonly known as the oaks. Quercus is their genus name. Family members are distinguished by their species name. He also shows how three members of the Cornus (dogwood) family differ from each other.last_img read more

fofabvlic

Number of problem credit unions fall in Q1 2015; Assets and shares increase

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by: Keith LeggettThe National Credit Union Administration reported that the number of problem credit unions fell by 18 during the quarter to 258 credit unions at the end of the first quarter of 2015. There are 50 fewer problem credit unions compared to a year ago.A problem credit union has a CAMEL rating of 4 or 5.Problem credit unions held $10.3 billion in shares (deposits) and $11.6 billion in assets at the end of the first quarter of 2015. In comparison, shares and assets at problem credit unions were $10.2 billion and $11.5 billion at the end of 2014, respectively.Shares at problem credit unions equaled 1.14 percent of the industry’s insured shares and approximately 1 percent of the industry’s assets. continue reading »last_img read more

fofabvlic

Learning the credit union ropes

first_imgCUES member Stefanie Rupert, CIE, then a financial services executive from the Chicago area, was offered the chief operating officer post at Collins Community Credit Union in 2011 following a two-hour conference call interview and a day-and-a-half onsite visit to meet the board, executive team and direct reports at the Cedar Rapids, Iowa, CU.Rupert got a second call soon after the job offer, asking if she would consider being trained as president/CEO Richard Benhart’s successor, an opportunity she also accepted. She assumed full leadership of the $953 million credit union on April 1.Despite that early offer, “I had to earn it,” says Rupert of her five years learning the credit union way. “And that’s where Rick was amazing. The departing CEO has to be extremely open to allowing a prospective successor to have authority and to make decisions and try new things that the organization has not seen or done before.” continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

fofabvlic

Take off those blinders!

first_imgIt’s not easy to face facts that, as leaders, we frequently get in our own way. How often do you do or say things that create results just opposite of what you are trying to achieve?It’s not enough to have good intentions if we’re not clear about how we’re being perceived. Perhaps surprisingly, most of us are quite unaware of our impacts and continue blindly along our way.Start HereIt helps to first get clear on what you want to accomplish, and then determine if it’s you who’s getting in the way of your desired results.Start by addressing these initial questions: ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

fofabvlic

Take a tour: Broadbeach’s newest highrise is here Vue Broadbeach

first_imgThere’s a range of one, two and three-bedroom apartments.“North Broadbeach has remained relatively untouched for many years and has always been known as a quality residential area,” she said. “We wanted to create something special that would add to its character and have designed a very organic-shaped building that will provide a real point of difference.” The development features a mix of one, two and three-bedroom configurations, some with a study or multipurpose room. The building includes floor-to-ceiling glass to maximise views and is orientated to the northeast to take advantage of natural light. A whole floor would be dedicated to resident facilities. “We’ve purposely situated the amenities on the second floor so the swimming pool will enjoy all day sun, and to provide easy access to the resident’s lounge, sauna and alfresco barbecue areas,” Ms Andrews said. “It also provides for a spectacular entrance using a void in the lobby, giving it a sense of grandness and space.” Vue development, First Ave, Broadbeach has officially started today.THE $70 million Vue Broadbeach 25-storey tower will provide the lucky occupants of its 84 apartments with sublime ocean views along with an entire floor dedicated to recreation facilities.Construction of the $70 million Vue Broadbeach tower is expected to start in March. The building includes floor-to-ceiling glass to maximise views and natural light. Vue Broadbeach, First Ave, Broadbeach.The 25-level project will feature 84 apartments, including two expansive penthouses and a maximum of four residences per floor on a 1214sq m site at 10-12 First Ave. It’s the sixth highrise project for the local family developer Andrews Projects, and their first in the area. More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach Northless than 1 hour ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa20 hours agoSales manager Sarah Andrews said the development would suit owner occupiers and buyers seeking a central location. A swimming pool, resident’s lounge, sauna and barbecue area will take up the second floor.Ms Andrews said the building would have low body corporate fees. The development is situated about 150m from the beach and a light rail station is located at the end of the street. The sales centre is on the corner of Albert Ave and the entrance to Niecon Plaza in Broadbeach and is open seven days.last_img read more

fofabvlic

Dutch minister rejects flexible retirement age for state pension

first_imgWouter Koolmees, the Netherlands’ minister for social affairs, has again rejected the idea of a flexible retirement age for the country’s state pension (AOW).Answering questions posed by Corrie van Brenk, MP for the party for the elderly (50Plus), Koolmees argued that it would be bad for the state’s finances, while implementation would be “very complicated”.Van Brenk referred to a study by researcher Sander Muns, which concluded that a flexible AOW age could help workers in physically demanding jobs with a small occupational pension to retire early. His findings ran contrary to a survey, carried out by economic research institute SEO – affiliated with Amsterdam University – and commissioned by the government in 2017. However, Muns based his survey on the assumption of a lower benefits discount for early retirement, as well as a lower social minimum income level. This would ensure that the income of workers taking early retirement would not drop below the social minimum.However, in Koolmees’ opinion, this would put people off taking early retirement, as the SEO study had suggested that they didn’t want to end up at the social minimum level.He added that most employees had sufficient occupational pension rights to cease working early without ending up below the social minimum.“Therefore, the added value of a flexible AOW remains very limited,” he argued. An additional disadvantage of a flexible retirement age, Koolmees said, was that it would place a duty of care on the government “to prevent elderly [people] falling into poverty for the long term”.A flexible retirement age for the AOW is one of the conditions that Dutch unions have set in order to persuade them to return to the negotiating table for wider pensions reform.last_img read more

fofabvlic

Mud Bowl

first_imgI recently read in the Lawrenceburg paper that Lawrenceburg High School is putting a synthetic surface on their football field.  For the past several years the “Bowl”, as it is known in Lawrenceburg, has been subject to poor drainage and it is almost an impossibility to keep grass growing on the field.  No one can fault the Tigers for wanting to keep the tradition of Dick Meador Field going. If you have been at the high school, you know they have a new facility behind the high school for track and soccer, but the field near US 50 has been the football home forever.Just a few years ago on a rainy Friday night, Batesville and Lawrenceburg almost set a national scoring record because no one could tackle anyone on the slippery surface that night.  When the Bulldogs travel to Lawrenceburg this fall, it won’t matter if it is a clear starry night or another downpour, the field will be playable.  Tradition will survive for the Tigers!last_img read more

fofabvlic

All or nothing for McDowell

first_img Press Association McDowell missed the cut in last week’s Irish Open but reaped the rewards of staying on at Carton House over the weekend to work on his game, the first prize of 500,000 euro (£431,000) taking him less than 30,000 euro (£26,000) behind US Open champion Justin Rose at the top of the European Tour’s Race to Dubai. “It’s very special after the last couple of months,” McDowell admitted. “It’s been a bit of a battle. It’s been a funny year. My game has not felt far away most weeks but I have missed a lot more cuts than normal and missing cuts hurts. “It certainly motivated me a lot the last few weeks. The US Open was a tough one to take and missing the cut in Ireland last week; it made me more hungry to want to be in positions like I was this afternoon.” The 33-year-old began the day tied with Sterne and went out in 34 with three birdies and one bogey, but found himself one behind after Sterne reached the turn in 33. A birdie on the 10th got McDowell back on level terms and he reclaimed the lead when Sterne dropped his first shot of the day on the 12th after driving into heavy rough. Luck certainly appeared to be on McDowell’s side as he pulled his tee shot on the 16th but saw the ball take a fortunate bounce away from the heavy rough and kick 90 degrees right. That left him with a relatively simple up and down, but he needed more good fortune after pulling his par putt and the sheepish grin after it somehow found the left edge of the hole told its own story. Sterne had called for a “G-Mac bounce” after also pulling his tee shot but was not so fortunate and a bogey four gave McDowell a two-shot lead with two to play, the Northern Irishman then making certain of victory with a superb birdie on the 17th. If current form is anything to go by, Graeme McDowell will either miss the cut or win his second major title in next week’s Open Championship at Muirfield.center_img Usually a highly consistent player, McDowell admits 2013 has been a “funny year” that has brought either a missed cut or a victory in each of his last eight events, the most recent coming in the Alstom Open de France on Sunday. McDowell carded a closing 67 at Le Golf National to finish nine under par, four clear of South Africa’s Richard Sterne, who had been only one behind until bogeys at the 16th and 17th. Sterne eventually did well to par the 18th for a final round of 71 to make sure of outright second, with 2007 winner Graeme Storm and Spain’s Eduardo de la Riva a shot behind. last_img read more

fofabvlic

Bony delighted with City move

first_img Bony’s move was confirmed by both Barclays Premier League clubs in synchronised statements on their club websites on Wednesday afternoon, although the Ivory Coast Football Federation had earlier announced the transfer on Twitter. The 26-year-old is currently on international duty with the Ivory Coast ahead of the African Nations Cup, which starts in Equatorial Guinea this weekend and could prevent his City debut until the middle of next month. “I believe we can do it.” Bony scored 20 Premier League goals in 2014, more than any other player, but promised there is much more to come from him after linking up with his Ivory Coast colleague Yaya Toure at club level. “I speak with Yaya every day on international duty and I think he will help me to become a better player and a more clinical striker,” Bony said. “I’ll be playing with great players here at City and this is an opportunity for me to work hard and to take my chance. “The Premier League is a tough league – my power is to always be in the box and in the right position. “I’m always working hard to be there to score the goals and to improve.” City manager Manuel Pellegrini said he was delighted to be adding the muscular Bony to a strikeforce which already includes Sergio Aguero, Edin Dzeko and Stevan Jovetic. “He is very difficult to mark because he is so strong,” Pellegrini told the official club website. “He is an intelligent footballer who has skill and power. “His goals record has been excellent since he came to England. He adapted very quickly to the game here and I think he will settle in at City quickly. He will be a very good addition to our squad. ” We now have four top-class strikers and I am looking forward to seeing them work together.” Bony’s departure means Swansea have almost doubled their transfer record for selling a player, the previous highest fee being the £15m Liverpool paid for Wales midfielder Joe Allen in 2012. The Ivorian took time to settle in South Wales and previous Swansea manager Michael Laudrup often left him out of the team due to concerns over the player’s fitness. But Bony’s double in a 3-2 defeat to Manchester City on New Year’s Day 2014 was the start of a prolific year and he ended up winning four awards at Swansea’s end-of-season function. “Everyone at Swansea City would like to thank Wilfried for his superb service to the club, and wish him well for the future,” said a statement on the Swansea website. Manchester City have completed the transfer of Swansea striker Wilfried Bony for a £25million fee. Bony has signed a four-and-a-half year contract at the Etihad Stadium and will wear the number 14 shirt. His fee could rise as high as £28million. He joins the English champions after scoring 34 goals in 70 appearances for Swansea following his £12m move from Dutch club Vitesse Arnhem in the summer of 2013. “It’s a great feeling for me, it’s a big honour to be here and it’s a great challenge,” Bony told the official Manchester City website. “As a player it’s always good to be part of one of the biggest clubs in the world and it’s a good opportunity for me to be in that situation now – I’m really proud. “I felt excited to wait for this moment and now it’s come, it’s fantastic. “I think it’s a great decision for me – Manchester City is in the Champions League. “You remember at the end of last season I said that if I want to move it will be to a team in the competition because it’s a great tournament that I really want to play in and one that I want to win. “It’s a motivation for me to give my maximum to be in that place. City is a big club with great players with a lot of experience. Press Associationlast_img read more