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ND research labs donate supplies to help fight PPE shortages

first_imgAs hospitals around the country face shortages of personal protective equipment, or PPE, Notre Dame research labs that have paused operations have donated their supply of PPE to the Saint Joseph County Unified Command, which is leading the local response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Jessica Brookshire, senior program director for the Office of Clinical Partnerships at Notre Dame Research, said 34 labs had donated supplies as of April 2. “A communication went out on March 20 to all faculty regarding the lab ramp-down process,” Brookshire said in an email. “In this communication, it was mentioned that local healthcare providers were in need of PPE and if they had items to donate to contact me.”As the number of COVID-19 cases continues to rise globally, PPE suppliers have struggled to meet the massive increase in demand. Sherri Bucher — adjunct associate professional specialist at the Eck Institute for Global Health and global health practitioner — said combatting COVID-19 is a complex process for many reasons, emphasizing the difficulty of dealing with a completely new virus.“Within the public health and the medical setting, we talk all the time about evidence-based guidelines, evidence-based policies, evidence-based medical and nursing care,” Bucher said. “When you are presented with something that has very little evidence base, it’s really hard to respond to it.”While the virus causing COVID-19 is in the same family as the coronaviruses that cause the common cold, influenza, SARS and MERS, Bucher said it appears those who have been infected are highly contagious before they have begun showing symptoms, leading to the possibility that some of those infected never show symptoms at all. The delayed display of symptoms, Bucher said, has facilitated the rapid and extensive spread of the virus.The complexity of the disease and the global scale of the outbreak has upset a delicately balanced system of supply and demand for PPE, Bucher said, in which the healthcare, manufacturing, supply chain and logistics, public health and financing sectors all play a part. This list, Bucher said, is by no means exclusive.“They‘re all part of a system to ensure that there‘s the right kind of PPE, that it‘s good quality, that it reaches the people who need it when they need it,” Bucher said. “That system, which is very complicated and is across many different sectors, has to work cooperatively to make sure that the supply and the demand meet each other. Even in the best of times, this is a really complicated system.”Even with rationing measures in place, the amount of PPE needed for a hospital treating patients with COVID-19 is massive.“For example, in the state of Indiana, there’s one health system I know of that — and this is conservative, this is under sort of rationing — they still use between 15,000 and 30,000 facemasks a day,” Bucher said. “That’s one health system within the state of Indiana, that‘s not the number of masks in all the state of Indiana every day. That‘s just six or seven hospitals. So if you multiply that by county, by state, by federal, you can start to see the quantity that‘s needed.”For a disease like COVID-19, Bucher said, the World Health Organization recommendations for PPE include goggles, aprons, gloves, face shields and more. Further, PPE needs to fit properly in order to be effective and requires specific machinery and materials.“Many of our medical commodities, of course, are manufactured in China and China has been slammed,” Bucher said. “They had their manufacturing shut down. They‘re just now getting started. But they‘re very cautious, as they are right to be because they‘re worried about a second wave of COVID-19. It‘s not as simple as just converting a factory that makes pillowcases to a factory that makes face masks.”Between the lack of concrete information, the multiple models predicting the spread of the disease and a shortage caused by simultaneous demand in 180 countries, Bucher said, hospital administrators are doing the best they can with the information they have.“If you‘re a good hospital administrator, you want to plan very conservatively,” Bucher said. “You want to plan for the worst case, and in that case, you need to try to preserve your PPE. At the same time, you want to protect your health care workers and you want to protect your patients. So it’s just a really hard problem and I don‘t think there’s any easy answer.”Brookshire said she feels proud of the way Notre Dame faculty has responded to the crisis.“At a time that they were asked to hibernate their work, they gave of their resources to help others,” Brookshire said in an email. “In addition, I heard from colleagues that they were sharing the need for PPE with friends/family/co-workers and thinking of additional opportunities to help the community.”The most common item donated has been gloves, but there have been thousands of individual items donated as well. While the high-quality items found in research labs are preferable to homemade masks, Bucher said, she is confident hospital administrators will find a way to use the masks thousands of people across the country are sewing and donating. Any sort of contribution to hospitals is part of the solution, Bucher said. She emphasized that the attitude of community solidarity is “the best part of humanity” and is key to combating the virus.“The only other way we‘re going to get through this as a society, in addition to trusting science, is to pull together,” Bucher said. “There is no ‘them’ when it comes to this virus. There‘s only us.”Tags: COVID-19, Notre Dame research, PPE, St Joseph County Unified Command, World Health Organizationlast_img read more

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Vermont College of Fine Arts ranked first by Poets & Writer

first_imgVermont College of Fine Arts, the first independent college in Vermont in a quarter of a century, was in fact launched by an alumnus of the MFA in Writing Program, novelist and longtime college administrator Tom Greene. The impetus for independence was a desire to maintain the programs and the academic nature of the campus which were under the threat of being dismantled and sold piecemeal. Two years after going independent, success abounds. Vermont College of Fine Arts,Just two years after achieving independence, Vermont College of Fine Arts’ (VCFA) MFA writing programs have been ranked first among programs of their kind by Poets & Writers, the leading creative writing publication in the U.S. This honor comes on the heels of several other major achievements for VCFA, including achieving accreditation as a degree-granting institution in record time.Established in 1981, the Vermont College MFA in Writing Program is the original low-residency writing program in the country. The Atlantic named it one of the top five low-residency programs nationwide. The Writing for Children & Young Adults track was established in 1997 and was the nation’s first fully developed graduate program focusing on writing for young readers and numbers among its alumni New York Times bestsellers, ALA award winners and National Book Award finalists. Vermont College of Fine Arts is a national center for education in the arts, a place where the creative expression of individuals is nurtured and a sense of community flourishes. VCFA is the only graduate school in the country devoted exclusively to fine arts education, and the first independent college to form in Vermont since 1983. Offering three nationally successful Masters of Fine Arts (MFA) degrees in Visual Art, Writing, and Writing for Children & Young Adults, VCFA’s alumni are among the most celebrated authors and artists working today Source: VCFA. 9.8.2010center_img This ranking took into consideration VCFA’s Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Translation, and Writing for Children & Young Adults tracks for the MFA in Writing degree. The alumni from these programs have published over 1,200 books by almost every major house and won major literary awards.The 2011 Poets & Writers Magazine MFA rankings are comprised of individual rankings for both full-residency and low-residency programs that were measured in eight categories. The magazine’s goal of these rankings is to ‘better position applicants to make an important life choice.’ VCFA is tied for this position with Warren Wilson College. ‘To have our writing program ranked so highly by such a prestigious magazine in the field is quite an honor,’ says President Tom Greene. ‘But the quality of the MFA in Writing and Writing for Children Program is best evidenced in the incredible success of our alumni and the quality of our faculty. To have the programs acknowledged by Poets and Writers is a tribute to VCFA’s full writing community.’last_img read more

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Susan Parmer, American Red Cross Blood Services CEO, to Retire

first_imgThe American Red Cross today announced the retirement of Susan Parmer, RN, CEO of the American Red Cross Blood Services Northern New England Region, effective October 4. Her retirement will conclude a career of close to 30 years.Parmer began her career with the American Red Cross in 1982 as a staff nurse, traveling to blood drives throughout Vermont and northern New Hampshire. She served as an instructor for new staff and was appointed to positions of increasing responsibility throughout her tenure, including Director of Nursing, Director of Vermont Operations, Senior Director of Collections and Donor Recruitment and Regional Director of Donor Services and has served as CEO of the Northern New England Region, directing close to 400 employees within Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine, since 2005.In her capacity as CEO, Parmer has been responsible for all aspects of Red Cross blood collections throughout northern New England, assuring the successful collection of 190,000 units of whole blood and 26,000 platelet pheresis units annually for distribution to over 80 hospitals.  She was also instrumental in starting an autologous donor program, in which eligible candidates for surgeries requiring transfusions may donate their own blood for upcoming procedures. Under her leadership, the Northern New England Region has proven to be one of the most successful of the 36 Red Cross blood services regions throughout the United States and enjoys an excellent record of regulatory compliance.‘I never imagined, after starting out as a phlebotomist on our bloodmobiles that I would end up as the CEO of a three state region,’ said Parmer. ‘It has been wonderful learning the many aspects of blood collections, then moving into management.’Parmer attributes the successful blood collection program in northern New England to the many loyal and devoted volunteer donors who give blood for patients in need. In order to best accommodate these dedicated individuals and run an efficient and effective program, Parmer actively sought out successful business owners to learn from and emulate. By encouraging creative thinking and community outreach, and coordinating closely with all other Red Cross programs and services, the Northern New England Blood Services Region has become a model for the rest of the country.Parmer was presented the American Red Cross Employee Excellence Award in 2000 and was the Association of Donor Recruitment Professionals Nancy Chapman Scholarship recipient in 2006. She is a member of the American Association of Blood Banks, Association of Donor Recruitment Professionals and the Vermont State Nurses Association. She has also been an active member of the Burlington Rotary Club and has participated in numerous community service activities.She identifies two things as most memorable and valued during her Red Cross career ‘ meeting the many loyal blood donors who help save lives and working with the dedicated Red Cross staff and volunteers who work tirelessly to assure a plentiful community blood supply.‘Our blood donors never cease to amaze me,’ Parmer stated. ‘They are so humble about the amazing gift they are giving, a gift which may actually help save someone’s life.’Parmer and husband Steve have two sons. They plan on relocating to begin the next chapter in their lives.last_img read more

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Outdoor Updates: A 24-year-old woman has died while hiking to the “Into the Wild” bus

first_imgA short walk west of Teklanika (Tek) Campground is Tek River, which flows northward from the Alaska Range. NPS Photo Around 60 to 100 coal miners in Harlan County, Kentucky are blocking a railroad track, preventing coal trucks from leaving a mine owned by Revelation Energy LLC. The miners are occupying the track in protest, after Revelation Energy LLC filed bankruptcy and laid off the miners without paying the wages owed to them.  Laid-off miners in Kentucky protest over unpaid wages A 24-year-old woman has died while hiking to the “Into the Wild” bus The fatality occurred after Veramika Maikamava attempted to cross the Teklanika River by using a rope but was swept under water by the swift current. Her husband, Piotr Mrkielau, unsuccessfully attempted to rescue her, pulling her body out of the water about 100 feet from where she fell in. Maikamava is not the first hiker to die while attempting to reach Fairbanks Bus 142. In 2010, a hiker from Switzerland died in the same river while on her way to the bus. Many others have had to be rescued.  A study published in the journal Frontiers in Microbiology has found that apples carry more than 100 million bacteria and that some of the microbes found on apples are responsible for maintaining a healthy gut microbiome. The study also found that, while organic and non-organic apples both carry the same amount of bacteria, the bacteria on organic apples is more diverse and balanced, likely leading to both healthier and tastier apples. center_img Some of the miners are carrying signs that say, “no pay, we stay” and all of them are demanding to be paid for the work they completed for the company. “We get our money, this load of coal that’s on this train can go by,” Shane Smith, one of the protesting miners, told news station WYMT. “But until then, there’ll be no trains coming in, there’ll be no trains going out.” Smith also told WYMT that he’d be arrested before he would move, a sentiment shared with many of the other protesting miners.  A young woman from Belarus drowned while crossing the Teklanika River in Denali National Park on the way to Fairbanks Bus 142, a landmark made famous by the book and movie Into the Wild. Christopher McCandless died in the bus in 1992 while attempting to live off the land. After the book and movie about McCandless were released, the bus became a destination for some hikers. Study finds an (organic) apple a day really might keep the doctor away And if you’re one of the people who claim to taste the difference between organic and non-organic apples, this study may back you up. A microbe called methylobacterium, which is known to increase the flavored compounds in strawberries, was significantly more present in organic apples.last_img read more

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Amat hoping for league chance

first_img While the former Espanyol centre-half has featured in seven of Swansea’s eight Europa League games to date, he has found action harder to come by in the Premier League. Amat, 21, has just three league appearances to his name, all of which came during an enforced injury lay-off for Swans’ captain Ashley Williams. But the Spain Under-21 cap looked assured when given the chance to partner Williams in Thursday’s 1-1 draw with Kuban Krasnodar in the Europa League and pushed himself into contention to usurp Chico Flores at the heart of the Swansea defence. Amat feels he and Williams have formed a good understanding, but will be prepared to put the needs of the team first, as opposed to his own personal aspirations. “The team performance is the most important thing, and we played well in the first-half in Russia, although maybe we could have scored another goal. We need to learn from these mistakes,” he said. “As for myself, I enjoy playing with Ashley, I think the partnership looked good, the transitions were good, the communication is good, so I would obviously like to keep playing in the team. “But I am not the manager and I can only play as well as I can when I do play, whether that is with Ashley or Chico. “I don’t know if I am getting better, but I think we played very well against Kuban and we were unlucky in the last minute. “We must all try and use what happened there as a motivation to come back and win the next game.” While Mark Hughes is looking to tweak the manner in which Stoke play, the Potters remain a real threat from set-pieces meaning Amat, if selected, will have a big part to play. Jordi Amat hopes he has done enough to force himself into the Swansea starting line-up for Sunday’s meeting with Stoke. The Spaniard is keen for Swansea to improve a recent record of two wins from nine games in all competitions and give supporters of the Welsh club a boost ahead of the international break. “It is difficult to switch straight away to thinking about Stoke after playing in the Europa League, but we are getting used to it and will do as we have done before. “This is a very important game, not just in terms of getting the three points at home, but to lift the fans after some tough games.” Thursday’s draw in Russia, as a result of relinquishing a lead in stoppage time in both fixtures against Kuban, means Swansea will have to wait to confirm their place in the Europa League knockout stage. But Amat has urged his team-mates not to dwell on their late slip-up. “It was unlucky because we had control of the game and it was expected in the second-half they would try and push more. “But to concede in the last seconds again is incredible and just unlucky. We have to just win the next game now against Valencia and not think too much about these two games with Kuban.” Press Associationlast_img read more

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Fabregas out of Spain games

first_img Press Association Cesc Fabregas has been ruled out of Spain’s upcoming matches against Belarus and Germany with a hamstring injury. However, Chelsea manager Jose Mourinho said he had taken a “gamble” with Fabregas’ fitness by playing him, and the tests in Spain have revealed the full extent of the injury. A statement from the Spanish Football Federation (RFEF) said: “The Chelsea midfielder has been ruled out for the games against Belarus and Germany following tests and an evaluation of his condition that was carried out this morning by the medical staff of the Spanish national team. “The MRI done this morning in the Sanitas Clinic in La Moraleja (Madrid) showed a clear improvement with respect to the one done by his club on Sunday. “Although the MRI discards a hamstring tear, the player continues to have discomfort and the medical team considers that his involvement in the next games would not be advisable for his complete recovery.” The news will no doubt please Mourinho, who had asked for the 27-year-old to remain in London this weekend in order to recover. Spain coach Vicente del Bosque has called up Villarreal midfielder Bruno Soriano as Fabregas’ replacement. Fabregas has joined Manchester City’s David Silva and Barcelona’s Andres Iniesta on the sidelines. Del Bosque left out Chelsea striker Diego Costa for the upcoming games, with the former Atletico star needing to rest after recent injury troubles of his own. Spain host Belarus on Saturday before facing world champions Germany in Vigo on November 18. center_img The Chelsea midfielder will return to London on Tuesday afternoon after undergoing tests in Madrid. Fabregas played the whole of Chelsea’s 2-1 Premier League win over Liverpool at Anfield on Saturday and was included in Spain’s squad for this weekend’s Euro 2016 qualifier against Belarus and the friendly against Germany next week. last_img read more

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Rampant Jaguars thump Red Force by 219 runs to seal emphatic win

first_img–Permaul voted match MVP, bowlers instrumental in 3rd round winBy Clifton RossTHE Guyana Jaguars got back to their winning ways after inflicting a 219-run win over the Trinidad Red Force, wrapping up a commanding display at home as round 3 ended yesterday at the Providence Stadium.Led by Man-of-the-match, Veerasammy Permaul, with a match-haul of 8 for 71 after picking up 4 for 29 in first innings and 4-42 in the second, Guyana outplayed the Darren Bravo side in all departments to shoot up back to the number 2 spot after their second round loss put them in 4th place.The visitors resumed day 4 on 122-6, needing 281 for a win before Permaul had other plans to mop up the tail within the first hour of play in the morning session.It was a feeble batting performance by the Red Force as opener Jeremy Solozano (34), Jason Mohamed (33), Yannick Cariah (27) and 22 apiece from Kjorn Ottley and Terrance Hinds failed to take them close to the target as they were knocked over for 186, batting a second time.Red Force were put under pressure from the inception after the Jaguars racked up 332 batting first, thanks mainly to Anthony Bramble’s 91, Tagenarine Chanderpaul (68) and Chris Barnwell (58).Red Force spinner, Bryan Charles, grabbed 7 wickets in a losing effort while his team had a completely opposite experience when they fell for 98 in their 1st innings.Rookie pacer, Niall Smith’s lethal 5-7 opening burst rocked the Red Force as they crashed below 100. Smith ended with brilliant figures of 5-12 and grabbed a wicket in the second innings after making the first breakthrough of the morning.Jaguars skipper Leon Johnson’s decision to declare on day 3 with the score 177-5 proved to be a brilliant call as the Red Force batsmen were unable to maintain partnerships due to the constant loss of wickets.Fast-bowler Keon Joseph (2-15) set the tone while spinners Kevin Sinclair, who grabbed a wicket and the experienced Devendra Bishoo (2-39) along with Permaul kept a choke-hold on the Trinidadians during their second innings.Following the match, the Guyana Cricket Board (GCB) presented Permaul with a trophy for his 500-wicket milestone. Territorial Development Officer (TDO) Colin Stuart, during the handing over of the trophy, encouraged the left-arm spinner to be a role model for other spinners and the future generation.last_img read more

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Syracuse survives toughest test of season with win over DePaul

first_img Related Stories Women’s basketball overcomes “bumps and bruises” to defeat DePaulGallery: Syracuse beats DePaul 84-80 Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on January 16, 2013 at 12:48 am Contact Kevin: kmprisei@syr.educenter_img With just more than a minute left, Carmen Tyson-Thomas received the ball after an inbounds pass and dribbled down the court as the shot clock wound down. With Syracuse clinging to a one-point lead, making the most of the possession was imperative.Forced into a hurried 3-point attempt just before the clock expired, Tyson-Thomas couldn’t get the shot to fall. But Kayla Alexander was well positioned to grab the rebound, leading to a second-chance bucket for Tyson-Thomas that expanded Syracuse’s lead to three.The crucial rebound and subsequent basket helped the Orange come away with a tight 84-80 victory over DePaul (13-5, 2-2 Big East) in front of 450 fans in the Carrier Dome Tuesday. The win, SU’s eighth in a row, moves Syracuse to 15-1 on the season, 3-0 in conference play heading into Saturday afternoon’s matchup with perennial powerhouse Connecticut.“Our team just keeps fighting,” SU head coach Quentin Hillsman said. “We see that fight as we go into these games. They just continue to compete.”Watch: Hillsman, players discuss Syracuse’s win over the Blue DemonsAdvertisementThis is placeholder textBefore Tuesday night, the first seven games of Syracuse’s winning streak were all won by 13 points or more. Aside from close battles with future Atlantic Coast Conference rivals Georgia Tech and Virginia in November’s San Juan Shootout, the Orange hadn’t had a true down-to-the-wire test.That changed Tuesday. DePaul showed poise early on the road, taking advantage of SU’s soft-perimeter defense to shoot 8-for-18 from 3-point range in the first half. DePaul’s fast-paced offensive attack kept the Orange on its heels as the Blue Demons led 46-40 at the break.Syracuse responded immediately after halftime with a 7-0 run, taking a 47-46 lead. But DePaul refused to go away. During the middle of the second half, many SU possessions lasted less than 15 seconds with players taking and missing quick shots. DePaul took a 65-59 lead with less than 10 minutes to play.“We got some open shots off initial catches,” Hillsman said. “They might not have been the shot that we wanted on that possession, but it’s tough to tell your team to not take open shots.”Despite the lack of experience in close games this season, SU has an abundance of veteran leadership, and it came through at the end. Along with critical plays by seniors Tyson-Thomas and Alexander down the stretch, junior Rachel Coffey stepped up with two free throws to put the Orange up 83-78 with 32 seconds left.After a DePaul basket made the score 83-80 with 16 seconds left, Tyson-Thomas was fouled and made it a two-possession game with a free throw with 10 seconds remaining. After going 2-for-6 from the line in the first half, the Orange responded with a 19-for-24 effort after the break. For the game, Alexander and Elashier Hall combined to go 11-for-14 from the line.“I think you just have to adjust when it’s close,” Coffey said. “Even in blowouts, you have to play like it’s close. …We’ve kind of all been in every situation.”With the win, the Orange has now tied the best start in program history, as well as its best Big East start. Syracuse’s only loss so far is to Temple, a 74-67 decision Dec. 2.It doesn’t get any easier for SU this weekend. Syracuse travels to No. 3 Connecticut, but the team is looking forward to the challenge. Coming off of a 30-point-blowout win over Georgetown Saturday, which snapped a seven-game losing streak to the Hoyas, the Orange showed Tuesday that it could come away with a narrow victory when things get tight.The poise under pressure should serve the team well down the stretch, Hillsman said.“They’re hard-nosed kids,” Hillsman said. “They play for a coach who just keeps pushing them and keeps pushing them, because I know the toughest team will always win. I give them a lot of credit, and I’m just really happy to be where we are right now.” Commentslast_img read more

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Friend groups might not be as diverse, study finds

first_imgThough USC is the most internationally diverse university in the country, diversity might not translate to friend groups, according to a recent study by the Group Process & Intergroup Relations.The study concluded that as large universities become more diverse, students tend to only make friends with those who share their own interests and backgrounds.The study refers to the term “social selection” — the idea that students will actively select friends who are ethnically similar and have like interests.USC, with its large international population, seems to follow this trend. The Freshman Profile and Admisson Information 2011-2012 revealed an increase in the international student population.“Greater human diversity within an environment leads to less personal diversity within dyads,” the study said.One reason for this might be that students’ unfamiliarity with college leads them to form friends with those similar to themselves, said Linda Wong, executive director of the Center for Urban Education at the USC Rossier School of Education.“For a lot of freshman students, attending college may be their first experience away from home and with such unfamiliar surroundings,” Wong said. “I am not surprised by the study, but I do believe it is the job of the university to create an environment that enables students to establish diverse relationships.”In comparison with last year’s Freshman Profile, the number of international students increased 4 percent. Among freshmen, 15 percent tends to come from areas such as China, South Korea, Canada and India.Of enrolled freshmen at USC, 7 percent identifies as African-American, 12 percent as Latino/Hispanic, 2 percent as Native American/Pacific Islander and 25 percent as Asian. Of freshmen, 39 percent are Caucasian, compared with 42 percent in 2010 statistics.Mayur Shah, an undeclared freshman, said the study accurately depicts the social environment at USC.“Walking around campus, I see people of the same ethnicity hanging out together a lot more than I see a mix,” Shah said. “This is understandable, though, because a lot of us are looking for familiarity in a new environment, and especially for internationals, I think it is a difficult transition.”Wong said the university needs to proactively integrate diversity into all aspects of school life in order to create a diverse environment on campus.“The study shows that simply creating a diverse campus won’t necessarily create a diverse individual,” Wong said. “Students must be willing to go beyond comfort zones while the university must create an environment that gives them that opportunity.”Ryan Choi, a freshman majoring in chemical engineering, said he attempts to find friends who match his interests, not necessarily his ethnicity.“Just because I’m Asian doesn’t mean I only want Asian friends,” Choi said. “For me, social selection just means finding nice people who are accepting of my interests and ideas.”A diverse community is crucial for a university and prepares students for life after college, Wong said.“Exposure to diversity is critical because that’s the nature of the world we live in,” Wong said. “At some point, we all experience it. To have an opportunity in a university environment will better prepare students for the real world.”last_img read more

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Boxing Jam with Music at GOtv Night 13

first_imgSpeaking at a press conference in Lagos on Tuesday, CEO of Flykite Promotions, Jenkins Alumona, the event organiser, explained that GOtv Boxing Night 13 seeks to fuse music and boxing because they are two most popular strains of entertainment.“Boxing and music provide entertainment. We decided to provide a better rounded entertainment package for fans as an end of the year present. Whether it is music you want or boxing or both, you have an unbeatable package with the quartet of Small Doctor, Reekado Banks, Falz and Simi as well as top class boxing action, including two African Boxing Union (ABU) title fights,” said Alumona.He disclosed that buses will be provided to convey fans, who buy tickets from the National Stadium to the event venue and bring them back.The event will feature seven fights across weight divisions, with the headline bout being the ABU lightweight title fight between Nigeria’s Oto Joseph and Egypt’s Abdulrahim Ahmed.Also scheduled is the ABU light welterweight title bout between Olaide Fijabi of Nigeria and Michael Odhiambo of Kenya. The third international duel of the night is the West African Boxing Union (WABU) middleweight title clash, which will see incumbent champion, Abolaji Rasheed, seeking to stop contender, Ghana’s Aryee Ayitteh.There will be two domestic title bouts. One of these will see fast rising Rilwan Babatunde go up against Chijioke Ngige in the light welterweight category. The other will see the flamboyant Rilwan Oladosu seek to win the vacant lightweight title when he takes on Kehinde Badmus.A lightweight challenge bout between Rilwan Oyekola and Jimoh Lukman will also hold. The fight line-up is completed by a national super middleweight challenge bout between Matthew Obinna and Cosmos David. Tickets are available at online ariiyatickets.com, National Stadium, Ebeano Supermaket and SLOT outlets.The best boxer at the show will go home with N2.5million, while the two runners-up will win N1million and N500,000 respectively.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Music and boxing are set to mix seamlessly at GOtv Boxing Night 13, scheduled to hold on December 26, at Landmark Events Centre, Victoria Island in Lagos.The event, which promises to be the biggest edition ever, will see four of the country’s biggest musical talents perform. Billed to perform are Small Doctor, Reekado Banks Falz The Bahd Guy and Simi.last_img read more