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Karen Ziemba & More Tapped for John Kander’s Kid Victory

first_img Tony winner Karen Ziemba and more have been enlisted for the New York premiere of Kid Victory off-Broadway. Directed by Liesl Tommy and featuring a book and lyrics by Greg Pierce, music by John Kander, with story by Kander and Pierce, the previously announced production will begin previews on February 1. Opening night is scheduled for February 22 at the Vineyard Theatre.Along with Ziemba (Contact) as Eileen, the cast will include Ann Arvia (Mary Poppins) as Woman, Joel Blum (Steel Pier) as Man, Laura Darrell (Frozen Live) as Girl, Jeffry Denman (White Christmas) as Michael, Brandon Flynn (Thirteen Reasons Why) as Luke, Daniel Jenkins (Mary Poppins) as Joseph and Blake Zolfo (The Lightning Thief) as Boy. Additional casting will be announced later.In Kid Victory, 17-year old Luke returns to his small Kansas town after a wrenching one-year absence. As his friendship grows with the town misfit, Emily, his parents realize that in order to truly find their son, they must confront some unnerving truths about his disappearance.    Karen Ziemba(Photo: Bruce Glikas) Related Shows View Commentscenter_img Kid Victory Show Closed This production ended its run on March 19, 2017last_img read more

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Agribusiness

first_imgBy Stephanie SchupskaUniversity of GeorgiaJohn McKissick stands in the middle of Georgia’s top industry, watching numbers swirl around in a high-rolling agricultural market that doesn’t attract much attention.He and others at the Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development at the University of Georgia help Georgia farmers market their products in a sometimes confusing and ever-changing business world.”Food manufacturing — food and processing — is increasing and is more important to Georgia than any other industry,” said McKissick of the Center for Agribusiness, where he is director. He is also the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics’ UGA Cooperative Extension program coordinator.”For the farmers to remain competitive, marketing is important for them,” said Fred White, head of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ department of agricultural and applied economics. “Marketing has to be emphasized, especially as farmers diversify away from commodity animal and crop products.”Taken as a whole, agribusiness is the largest business in the state, McKissick said. Georgia’s agribusinesses topped $10.5 billion in 2005 farm gate value, or the value of the products farmers sell. That’s up from $10.28 billion in 2004.The 2005 Farm Gate Report, which McKissick and Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development research coordinator Susan Boatright filed in May, shows that Georgia’s agricultural production value continued to expand in 2005. But the pace was modest. Gains in vegetables, row crops, fruits and nuts offset declines in poultry, the state’s largest farm enterprise.”With the growing population we have in Georgia and Florida, we’ve got good markets for perishable products like fruits and vegetables,” McKissick said. “And turfgrass has gone up in farm gate value.”The agribusiness center, operated through the UGA CAES, does more than just study farm-related production.”We do a lot more with agribusinesses,” McKissick said. “We work with new, emerging agribusinesses across the state, helping them find markets for their existing or new products.”The term agribusiness can be confusing. But McKissick says it covers all firms that work to get fiber processed or food to the table.Recently, the agribusiness center found itself studying milk. A Georgia dairy wanted to find out which product buyers would be willing to pay more for, organic milk or milk from grass-fed cows.”Consumers were willing to pay more for the pastured product, but they wouldn’t pay more for the organic production,” McKissick said. “Milk produced from the pastured cows was seen as ‘happy milk'” from cows peacefully grazing in a pasture. “The organic didn’t matter enough that they were willing to pay for it.”Another study looked at the reasons Georgia is losing dairies. The hope in doing the milk study was to attract big dairies to the state, drawing them in partially because of the high milk prices shoppers pay, McKissick said.They’ve found places in southwest Georgia that could be good for dairies, areas that don’t have many animals or people. “The economic impact of the larger-scale dairies in this area” would be great, he said.Helping create such impacts from apiaries to zucchini is something McKissick does so well that he recently became UGA’s first distinguished professor of agricultural marketing.”John has a wealth of knowledge and expertise in ag marketing,” White said. “He has been recognized by the national agricultural economics community. He is a very dedicated and highly energetic professional.”The professorship was established by an initial endowment from the Milton M. Ratner Foundation. It was approved by the University System of Georgia Board of Regents and goes into effect July 1.For more information on the Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development, call (706) 542-2434 or e-mail caed@agecon.uga.edu.(Stephanie Schupska is a news editor with the University ofGeorgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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Editorial: Planned Sunflower coal plant ‘is an idea whose time has expired’

first_imgEditorial: Planned Sunflower coal plant ‘is an idea whose time has expired’ FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Kansas City Star:What Kansas really needs is a nice new asbestos plant or metal mine. Maybe we could bring back production of lead paint or the Ford Pinto. Or strictly as a backup, a power plant fired by “beautiful, clean coal” sending beautiful, clean mercury, arsenic and dioxins into the atmosphere, along with a whole delightful mélange of greenhouse gases.Even proponents of that last one have got to know that The Star’s report of “significant interest” in a new coal-fired power plant in Holcomb, outside Garden City, reflects the very latest thinking from the 1880s.There is a reason that no such facility has been built in this country in the last four years, and that not one is under construction, either.Kansas gets more than a third of its electricity from wind energy — more than any other state. Both wind and solar power are getting more cost-effective all the time, and coal ever less competitive.Yet Hays-based Sunflower Electric Power Corporation has asked for an 18-month extension of the permit it needs “to finalize the arrangements that would support its construction” of a plant it doesn’t need, according to the request it sent to the state. The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) renewed the permit through March 27 of next year.Unnecessary, expensive and bad for the environment, this project is an idea whose time has expired.More: Kansas doesn’t need new coal-fired power plant spewing ‘beautiful, clean’ toxinslast_img read more

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Two sides of the coin when calculating credit union technology TCO

first_imgKeeping up with the latest and greatest in credit union technology is an ongoing battle and essential to maintaining your competitive edge in the credit union marketplace. As all credit union CEO’s and CTO’s know all too well, the cost of staying on top and always having the ‘best in breed’ technology and tools often comes at a steep price. Careful consideration needs to be taken when evaluating the true cost of your technological investments, and the financial impact of their utilization over the course of their lifespan. No successful analysis on the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) is complete if you include only the costs of initial investment and long-term operational expenses, and not take into account the cost savings achieved through operational efficiencies the technology provides.Starting with the obvious, the cost of the software, hardware and training, then moving on to enumerate the long-term and operational expenses. These expenses should include future upgrades, providing adequate security measures and detailed backup and recovery plans, in addition to maintenance measures, staff resources and training. However, technology is in place not just as a line item on the expense sheet but should provide added operational efficiencies to offset the investment. Investing in the right core technology will help lower your overall operational expenses by creating efficiencies in many ways, from speeding up the loan process to automating formerly manual processes that put a strain on staff. continue reading » 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Expressing gratitude key in communicating your brand post-coronavirus

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » Expressing gratitude is a key differentiator between those who are succeeding right now and those who are not.More and more states are relaxing lock-down protocols. The “curve” appears to have flattened and the economy shows at least some signs of improving.Most credit unions and community banks have focused on initial communication with their consumers. That’s great, but as we enter the next phase, how you communicate your brand will need to evolve.Expressing gratitude is a key focal point of this communication pivot.It has been a rocky road for financial institutions and their consumers. As lockdowns lift and lobbies open, expressing authentic gratitude for your members’ and customers’ continued support is critical.last_img read more

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Jalapenos eyed in Salmonella outbreak probe

first_img Based on information from 645 patients, at least 130 people were hospitalized, according to the CDC update. The outbreak has spread to 40 states and the District of Columbia, though many of the cases occurred in Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and Illinois. The most recent illness onset date is Jun 26, which is 6 days later than was listed in the CDC’s previous update and a sign that the outbreak is ongoing. See also: Meanwhile, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Jul 4 that it had linked another death to the outbreak, which involves the relatively rare Salmonella enterica Saintpaul strain. The man, from Texas, was in his eighties. (In earlier updates, the CDC said salmonellosis might have contributed to the death of a Texas man in his sixties who died of cancer.) Some infectious disease experts have criticized the FDA and CDC response to the outbreak, saying that poor communication with state and local health departments and missteps with case-control studies have hobbled the investigation. Last week the FDA said it was tapping into a larger laboratory network to speed the lab investigation. The CDC said in a Jul 4 update on the investigation that the identification in Texas and other states of many clusters of patients who ate at the same restaurants has led the agency to broaden its investigation, though tomatoes are still strongly linked to the illnesses. Also, the CDC said one ill person with salmonellosis matching the outbreak strain has been identified in Ontario, Canada. The patient said he or she had traveled to the United States and got sick upon return to Canada. According to unnamed sources who are familiar with the probe, investigators are looking at jalapenos as a leading suspect in the outbreak, the Wall Street Journal reported on Jul 5. Investigators are also considering cilantro and Serrano peppers, two other produce items that are commonly served with fresh tomatoes in Mexican cuisine, sources told the newspaper.center_img Jul 4 CDC updatehttp://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/saintpaul/ Today health inspectors on the Mexican border planned to begin stopping and checking shipments of ingredients common to Mexican food coming into the United States, according to Tommy Thompson, former US secretary of health and human services, CNN reported on Jul 4. Thompson told CNN he had been told about the plan. Glen Nowak, a CDC spokesman, told the Journal that the agency is focusing on 29 clusters linked to restaurants, most of which serve Mexican food and are not part of national chains. The outbreak, which began in early June, prompted federal health officials to advise consumers to avoid eating raw red round, Roma, or plum tomatoes from growing areas that had not been cleared by investigators. However, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not found Salmonella Saintpaul in any of the tomato samples it has tested. Jul 7, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – Federal investigators are eyeing jalapeno peppers as the possible culprit in a nationwide Salmonella outbreak that has now sickened 943 people in 40 states and involved at least one death.last_img read more

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New Zealand cop dies in ‘devastating’ shooting: PM

first_imgTopics : An unarmed New Zealand police officer was fatally shot on an Auckland street Friday, the force’s first death in the line of duty for more than a decade, with Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern describing the attack as “devastating”.Police said the officer and a colleague were carrying out a routine traffic stop involving a car carrying two people when one of them produced a rifle and opened fire.One officer died, another received serious leg injuries and a member of the public was hospitalized after being struck by the fleeing car, commissioner Andrew Coster said.Police immediately launched a massive search for the two men.”This was the type of work that our officers undertake every day to keep the public safe,” Coster told reporters.”At this stage, there is nothing to indicate that this job was going to be anything out of the ordinary.”He declined to speculate on a possible motive for the shooting.Ardern offered condolences to the officer’s family and police colleagues.”This is devastating news. Our police officers work hard every day to keep us and our communities safe,” she said in a statement.Armed police flooded the suburb of Massey in west Auckland searching for the offenders but Coster said they had not yet been found.The officer is the 23rd to be shot dead on duty since 1890, according to the police website, with the previous fatal shooting in 2009.Coster said the officers involved in the Auckland incident were unarmed.Police last week decided against introducing armed patrols and Coster said the shooting would not prompt him to revisit the issue.It comes just a day after parliament voted to further tighten New Zealand’s firearms laws in the wake of last year’s Christchurch mosques massacre, when a lone gunman murdered 51 Muslim worshippers.last_img read more

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Greece: When politics becomes theatre

first_imgThe Greek crisis will be a turning point for Europe, but it is for political leaders and not the ECB to decide in which direction, argues Joseph MariathasanWhen politics becomes theatre, the messenger can overshadow the message. The antics of former Greek finance minister Yanis Varoufakis always seemed more about improving his personal profile – perhaps with an eye to a lucrative post-government career on the lecture circuit – than a serious attempt to negotiate with hard-headed politicians constrained by the anxieties of their own domestic electorates.The referendum was pure theatre. My Greek friends tell me one needed a doctorate in economics to understand what the question meant, let alone decide how to vote in the best interests of the country.What the resounding No vote actually means is unclear, as the majority of the Greek population appear to want to remain in the European Union and the euro-zone, despite foreign politicians’ proclaiming beforehand that it would represent a decision to leave both. Greek prime minister Alexis Tsipras has at least showed a willingness to enter into a new set of negotiations by getting rid of Varoufakis, who proudly proclaims in his blog that he “shall wear the creditors’ loathing with pride”. Greece would have found it nigh on impossible to conduct further negotiations with Varoufakis still at the helm.But we come to bury Varafoukis, or at least his career as a minister, and not to praise him. The evil men do lives after them; the good is oft interred with their bones. So let it be with Varafoukis.The disappointment of his brief career as finance minister was that many of his points were valid. As he argues in his blog, the existing Greek ‘bailouts’ were exercises whose “purpose was to intentionally transfer private losses onto the shoulders of the weakest Greeks, before being transferred to other European taxpayers” (sic), although he fails to add that this was driven by panic at the prospect of the collapse of a number of Northern European banks, which could have led to untold consequences for Europe as a whole. Because he adopted a confrontational style to the point of absurd theatrics, he has been dismissed – along with his colleagues in Syriza – as a populist politician out of his depth.As we wait to see what the future holds, it is worth remembering that, although a strong case can be made that Greece would be better off outside the euro while remaining within the political umbrella of the EU, the euro-zone itself might be unable to take the risk of a Grexit.The Hotel Euro-zone is only programmed to receive. You can check out any time you like, but you can never leave. Or else the edifice would collapse. The biggest loser of that would be Germany, with exports collapsing as its currency appreciates against those of its European peers. And the collapse would hit not only Germany’s European markets – Chinese consumers might find that Ferraris have just as much status as Porches but are  suddenly more affordable.The problem for the EU and the euro-zone is that developing a rigid economic construct with a half-baked political construct will always be unstable. As Varoufakis points out, the International Monetary Fund itself recently released a report confirming Greek public debt was unsustainable. It is time European politicians recognised this fact.Whatever happens, the country must remain in the EU. The political consequences of Greece’s exit would be unfathomable, but the consequences for the rest of Europe of the country’s turning elsewhere for succour would not be pleasant either.A series of crises – which have provided opportunities for ever-closer union, even if not always welcomed by many of the participants – has driven the European project. The Greek crisis might prove to be a turning point, but it is for Europe’s political leaders and not the ECB to decide in which way.Joseph Mariathasan is a contributing editor at IPElast_img read more

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AWH Group completes bulk annuity transaction

first_imgThe AWH Group Pension Scheme, the pension fund for employees of the UK textile company AW Hainsworth, has completed a £2.3m (€2.7m) bulk annuity transaction, insured through Aviva.The deal was advised on by K3 Advisory along with H&C Consulting Actuaries.Jamie Cole, deal management lead at Aviva DB Solutions, said: “We’ve worked closely with the advisers to deliver this transaction.“Their focus on running an efficient process has helped secure this buyout, demonstrating the market is open for well-prepared small schemes.” Adam Davis, managing director at K3 Advisory, added: “The buyout market for small schemes is growing exponentially and K3’s unique approach is now helping such schemes stand out to insurers, helping secure them deals that otherwise may not be available to them.”The company, which is responsible for manufacturing ceremonial uniforms worn by the British Royal Family during state occasions and the military uniforms worn during the Charge of the Light Brigade, was established in 1783.last_img read more

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Woodside, Uniper in LNG supply deal

first_imgImage courtesy of WoodsideAustralian LNG player Woodside Energy signed a heads of agreement (HOA) with Uniper Global Commodities (Uniper) for the supply of the chilled fuel.Woodside would supply up to 0.6 million tons of LNG per annum over a period of four years commencing in 2019, the company said in a statement.Woodside CEO Peter Coleman said the LNG would be supplied from the company’s portfolio sources to markets in Europe and Asia.“This agreement illustrates further diversification of Woodside’s buyer relationships and the increasing interaction between participants in the Asia-Pacific and Atlantic LNG markets as international trading patterns become more liquid,” he said.Uniper CEO Keith Martin added the deal would see the company growing its Asian portfolio whilst leveraging its midstream assets in Europe.The HOA is conditional on the execution of a fully termed LNG sales and purchase agreement, Woodside said.last_img read more