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Soil- and enantiomer-specific metabolism of amino acids and their peptides by Antarctic soil microorganisms

first_imgMost nitrogen (N) enters many Arctic and Antarctic soil ecosystems as protein. Soils in these polar environments frequently contain large stocks of proteinaceous organic matter, which has decomposed slowly due to low temperatures. In addition to proteins, considerable quantities of D-amino acids and their peptides enter soil from bacteria and lengthy residence times can lead to racemisation of L-amino acids in stored proteins. It has been predicted that climate warming in polar environments will lead to increased rates of soil organic N turnover (i.e. amino acids and peptides of both enantiomers). However, our understanding of organic N breakdown in these soils is very limited. To address this, we tested the influence of chain length and enantiomeric composition on the rate of breakdown of amino acids and peptides in three contrasting tundra soils formed under the grass, moss or lichen-dominated primary producer communities of Signy Island in the South Orkney Islands. Both D- and L-enantiomers of the amino acid monomer were rapidly mineralized to CO(2) at rates in line with those found for L-amino acids in many other terrestrial ecosystems. In all three soils, L-peptides were decomposed faster than their amino acid monomer, suggesting a different route of microbial assimilation and catabolism. D-peptides followed the same mineralization pattern as L-peptides in the two contrasting soils under grass and lichens, but underwent relatively slow decomposition in the soil underneath moss, which was similar to the soil under the grass. We conclude that the decomposition of peptides of L-amino acids may be widely conserved amongst soil microorganisms, whereas the decomposition of peptides of D-amino acids may be altered by subtle differences between soils. We further conclude that intense competition exists in soil microbial communities for the capture of both peptides and amino acids produced from protein breakdown. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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US,UK Marines Conclude Exercise Blue Raptor

first_img View post tag: USMC Osprey Back to overview,Home naval-today US,UK Marines Conclude Exercise Blue Raptor View post tag: Royal Navy Share this article Authorities US,UK Marines Conclude Exercise Blue Raptor View post tag: HMS Ocean November 25, 2015 U.S. Marine Corps Osprey aircraft embarked on Royal Navy’s HMS Ocean transferred Royal and US Marines ashore Corsica during a simulated beach assault which rounded off Exercise Blue Raptor.The soldiers from Arbroath-based 45 Commando Royal Marines have been working with their US colleagues for the past few months, training and improving their track record of joint operations.To round off the training, Green Berets from Whiskey Company 45 Commando stormed ashore in Corsica with their US Marine Corps counterparts from the Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force (A).They made use of USMC Osprey aircraft in the last movement of Exercise Blue Raptor which saw them re-taking a stronghold from an enemy force.The assault group took off from the Royal Navy flagship HMS Ocean, where the USMC aircraft and US Marines have been embarked for the past few weeks.Exercise Blue Raptor represents the latest phase in the US Allied Maritime Basing Initiative which has sought to improve the integration of US forces with allies while operating in the Mediterranean.The Osprey have been embarked on HMS Ocean for the past few weeks while the Royal Navy flagship is deployed on Cougar 15.[mappress mapid=”17455″]Image: Royal Navylast_img read more

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Outrage from Oxford left following election result

first_img“We’re all in this because we want to help people, we just disagree on the methods. And so I’d never dream of referring to an opposing party as ‘scum’, ‘bastards’ or any of the other unsavoury terms I’ve seen people using against the Conservatives. We’re better than this, guys.”Meanwhile, Oxford University Labour Club (OULC) has written an open letter to ex-Labour leader Ed Miliband, thanking him for the work he did during his five years as Leader of the Opposition.Miliband resigned as leader last Friday after Labour’s worst election result since 1987, which left the party on 232 seats, a loss of 26 seats from 2010 and nearly a hundred seats short of David Cameron’s Conservative majority of 331.In his resignation speech, Miliband apologised for Labour’s poll-defying defeat, saying he took “absolute and total responsibility for the result”.Madalena Leao and Loughlan O’Doherty, OULC’s current co-chairs, commented, “For the Labour Club, and indeed the Labour movement at large, Thursday’s defeat was both unexpected in its magnitude, and immensely difficult in its implications. We are all of us dreading what a Tory government will do to this country.“However, we are also concerned that in the aftermath of the election the Labour Party regroup as quickly and effectively as possible.“In particular we are concerned that the loss of the election will prompt a rightward movement within the party and a loss of interest in some of what we consider to be highly important issues, and in particular a concern with the poorest and most vulnerable in society.“The letter itself makes clear why we think that Labour lost as it did. We do not, as of yet have any preference for a particular leader, we do however have strong opinions on the move the party needs to take.“We believe that the party needs to continue to build on its policies that target inequality and injustice within our society.“Growth is only valuable if it works for those at the bottom end of society, similarly business is only valuable if it benefits all, and in particular its least well paid employees.“This is not a case of ignoring middle class voters. Greater equality, a stronger NHS, a better education system, a society in which people don’t have to visit food banks, all these things benefit the whole of society.” Oxford Left Wing students have responded to the election result by initiating an anti-austerity movement, whilst Oxford University Labour Club (OULC) has written an open letter thanking Ed Miliband.Various left wing groups wishing to oppose the government gathered at the Wadham Refectory on Wednesday at an event entitled ‘Oxford Fight Back’, which was organised by Oxford Revolutionary Socialism in the 21st Century (rs21).Representatives from Trade Union Unite, OUSU’s LGBTQ Campaign, Oxford Antifascist Network, Mind your Head and Amnesty all attended the meeting. The group described themselves as “overall anti-austerity” and as “trying to build increased community links and protect the community from the Tory government”.LGBTQ Society trans rep Rowan Davis, who was chair of the meeting, commented, “In the face of five years of Tory cuts to civil liberties and the welfare state, hundreds of students and community members came together to channel the very personal anger they felt into organising a political resistance and filling in the gaps that Tory austerity will leave in its wake. The meeting successfully brought together a variety of disparate groups and I for one can’t wait to see what the new working groups come up with.”The group at the meeting did declare, however, that they were wary of creating yet another “patronising” student group that claims to want to reach out to the community.They plan to “tap into the traditions of Oxford protest” and involve themselves in other activism.They also showed interest in national demonstrations, particularly ‘End Austerity Now’, which will take place on 20th June in London. Maryam Ahmed, President of the Oxford University Conservative Association (OUCA) commented, “I am disappointed and upset at all the ad hominem attacks flying around on social media right now. As much as I might disagree with Labour, Lib Dem, Green, UKIP or even BNP policy, I really do believe that people of all political leanings have fundamentally good intentions.last_img read more

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Pasty power

first_imgWest Cornwall Pasty Co (WCPC) has come a long way since it was founded in 1998 about 150 miles to be precise, as it’s now based in Oxford. And the concept of Cornishness has been propelled further still, on a journey via the Caribbean towards the edges of reason, with the launch of a Reggae Reggae pasty, in association with Reggae Reggae sauce founder Levi Roots, last week.This offbeat offering typifies the jaunty spirit, underlined by street-wise business brains, that has fuelled WCPC’s emergence as one of the fastest growers on the BB75 league table of bakery retailers (British Baker, 15 January). It grew its estate by nearly a quarter in 2009, from 57 to 70 outlets, with three more opening since no mean achievement in the current climate.An eye-catching tweak is never far from its 20-strong pasty menu, and actually, there’s no questioning its Cornish credentials; pasties are supplied by serial Baking Industry Award-winner WC Rowe, based in Penryn, and plenty of products, from the jam to the scones in its cream tea, launched last summer, are sourced from the county.In 2007, current chief executive Richard Nieto led a reported £40m buyout of the chain, backed by Gresham Private Equity, with founders the Cocker family and Mark Christophers exiting. The funding was then in place to add 50 outlets to its 42-store total, and a potential target of 300 stores has already been mooted.”There is that potential, but we’ll just take 20 at a time, thanks!” says Nieto. “The important thing is getting the right ones open and making sure we employ the right people.”So what’s behind the positive attitude, when other businesses are sitting tight on store openings? “It’s the scale of the opportunity,” he says. “[In 2007] we saw a great traditional product that was only available in 42 places 18 of which were in London. We’ve got a very successful business, but an awful lot of towns don’t have a West Cornwall Pasty Co, and that’s the opportunity.”To minimise the identikit chain look, the stores are furnished with Cornish memorabilia and feature murals depicting scenes from traditional Cornish life, fronted by a striking black and gold logo. “What we’re trying to do is create a national brand that isn’t a replica of itself,” says Nieto. On the balcony of the store in Cambridge, there’s a fisherman leaning over into the market square; in Chester, there’s a 6ft pirate in the window. “We paint them differently, we put memorabilia and Cornish heritage in them surfing, pirates, tin mines so every shop is slightly different.”The priority is opening in railway stations and high streets. “That’s where the volume is,” states Nieto. One tweak in the strategy is a refit programme involving more seating space to appeal to families, with kids’ playboxes introduced with crayons and games and a sausage-and-beans pasty for the kids. Opening hours vary from store to store, with some travel locations open from 6am until 2am the next morning.”There’s an awful lot of competition,” he says. “We’re competing with everybody who wants to sell a breakfast, lunch or an afternoon snack. Some days people want a sandwich, other days they want a burger – we want to be one of their choices. We’ve got a lot of custo-mers who have breakfast with us every day, and a lot who will have a pasty two-to-three times a week.”Stores had been confined to south-east and south-west England, but the distribution centre in Oxford, close to the M40, is poised for a break northwards. Stores recently opened in Solihull, Shrewsbury, Liverpool and York, with two more planned for the latter in the coming months. Despite the challenge of finding old-style buildings in prime locations, as befits its strategy, Nieto says others’ misfortune has led to better availability of properties.”We tend to operate at heritage buildings in traditional British market towns or cities,” he explains. “We do well in tourist locations, such as Cambridge or Canterbury, Bath or Salisbury. There are just as many places like that in the north as there are in the south, and we have a very successful store in Chester. It’s just about picking the right opportunities, fitting it out at a sensible cost and using as much information and evidence as you can get to help you with the decision-making process.”With 20 shops opening a year, it’s only a matter of time before they’ll be eating Cornish cream teas in Carlisle.last_img read more

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News story: British Army’s new air defence missile blasts airborne target by Baltic Sea

first_img This trials firing is an important stepping stone towards bringing Land Ceptor into service with the British Army as part of the wider Sky Sabre air defence system. Land Ceptor performed as expected and the firing has helped us to verify innovative modelling of overall system performance. The DE&S project team, based in Bristol, will continue to work closely with our suppliers to ensure this cutting-edge system provides an effective shield for UK troops as they, in turn, protect the UK’s security and interests. Land Ceptor is highly mobile, can be rapidly deployed across challenging terrain, and be brought into action in less than 20 minutes.From the same family of weapons systems as Sea Ceptor, which will defend the Royal Navy’s Type 23 and Type 26 Frigates, Land Ceptor will provide the stopping power within the cutting-edge Sky Sabre air defence system, and will equip 16th Regiment, Royal Artillery. In the face of intensifying threats, it is vital that our Armed Forces have the capabilities to keep Britain safe. Land Ceptor will be a formidable battlefield barrier, protecting our troops from strikes and enemy aircraft while on operations. Land Ceptor completes it’s first successful firing trials. Crown copyright.The success of the Land Ceptor trials follows the Defence Secretary’s recent announcement of Sea Ceptor entering service with the Royal Navy proves CAMM’s effectiveness both in the land and maritime environments.The trial, which followed previous munitions tests, was the first time Land Ceptor had been test-fired as a whole system, including the cutting-edge SAAB Giraffe radar.The development and manufacture of Land Ceptor is enabled through a £250 million contract between Defence Equipment and Support (DE&S) and MBDA. Work to develop both Land Ceptor and Sea Ceptor is sustaining 760 MBDA jobs in the UK.DE&S Director Weapons, Richard Smart, said:center_img Trials of the new Land Ceptor weapon took place close to the Baltic Sea on a Swedish test fire range, with video footage showing a missile being launched from a vehicle and destroying an aerial target in a display of the new weapon’s accuracy and power.Built by MBDA, Land Ceptor comprises the Common Anti-air Modular Missile (CAMM), a launcher vehicle and two fire unit support vehicles. It is being developed to protect British troops on operations from aerial threats, including hostile combat aircraft and air-launched munitions.Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson said: Land Ceptor has far greater battlefield awareness and intelligence than the current Rapier system as its engagement range is three times greater and the Giraffe radar and Rafael Battlespace Management Command, Control, Compute, Communicate and Inform (BMC4I) system within Sky Sabre will be able to observe incoming threats from seven times further away.The missiles can be launched in quick succession to defeat as many as eight different threats at once, even if obstacles such as trees and terrain are in the way.The system will now undergo further development and trials before Sky Sabre enters service, in the early 2020s.last_img read more

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Widespread Panic Announces 2019 Summer Tour Dates

first_imgOn Thursday, Widespread Panic announced 10 new concert dates to their 2019 touring calendar, with newly scheduled performances in Mississippi, Colorado, and Florida set for this summer. Panic’s summer dates will follow the band’s previously announced spring tour, which includes sold-out shows in New York and North Carolina, before wrapping in mid-April. The eight new headlining shows on the band’s summer tour are accompanied by two performances at the 2019 RIDE Festival in Telluride Colorado on July 12th and 13th, which was also announced on Thursday.The run of summer dates will start with two shows at the Brandon Amphitheater in Brandon, Mississippi on June 7th and 8th, followed by a three-night stay at Morrison, CO’s Red Rocks Amphitheatre on June 28th, 29th, and 30th. The band will be back in action in Colorado for their multi-night appearance at RIDE Festival in mid-July before heading south for three nights at St. Augustine Amphitheatre in St. Augustine, FL on August 2nd, 3rd, and 4th.The band should be all loosened up and ready to hit the road this spring and summer after completing the 2019 edition of their annual Panic En La Playa destination concert event in Riviera Maya, Mexico late last month.Tickets for the shows at Brandon Amphitheater go on sale starting March 1st at 10 a.m. CT; Red Rocks on April 5th at 10 a.m. MT; and St. Augustine Amphitheatre on February 22nd at 10 a.m. ET. Fans can head over to the tour page on the band’s website for detailed ticket info.Widespread Panic Summer Tour DatesJune 7 – Brandon Amphitheater – Brandon, MSJune 8 – Brandon Amphitheater – Brandon, MSJune 28 – Red Rocks Amphitheatre – Morrison, COJune 29 – Red Rocks Amphitheatre – Morrison, COJune 30 – Red Rocks Amphitheatre – Morrison, COJuly 12 – RIDE Festival – Telluride, COJuly 13 – RIDE Festival – Telluride, COAugust 2 – St. Augustine Amphitheatre – St. Augustine, FLAugust 3 – St. Augustine Amphitheatre – St. Augustine, FLAugust 4 – St. Augustine Amphitheatre – St. Augustine, FLView All Tour Dateslast_img read more

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New evidence on Neanderthal mixing

first_imgNew research on a 45,000-year-old Siberian thighbone has narrowed the window of time when humans and Neanderthals interbred to between 50,000 and 60,000 years ago, and has shown that modern humans reached northern Eurasia substantially earlier than some scientists thought.Qiaomei Fu, a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and first author of a paper describing the research, said the sample had a long history before making its way into her hands.The bone was found eroding out of a Siberian riverbank, but no one knows precisely where. The bone changed hands several times before finding its way to the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany, where Fu was working with professors Janet Kelso and Svante Pääbo. Fu put the finishing touches on the research after she started in the laboratory of David Reich, HMS genetics professor.Carbon dating and molecular analysis filled in many of the blanks about the sample. Testing determined that the sample was from an individual who lived 45,000 years ago on a diet that included plants or plant eaters and fish or other aquatic life.Reich and Fu said the sample was remarkable because of the extraordinary preservation of its DNA, which allowed Fu, using the latest techniques for ancient DNA analysis, to extract a high-quality genome sequence. The sequence, Reich said, is significantly higher in quality than most genome sequences of present-day people generated for analysis of disease risk.The sequence revealed that the bone came from a modern human, a man whose remains are the oldest ever found and carbon-dated outside of Africa and the Middle East. Comparison to diverse humans around the world today showed that the man was a member of one of the most ancient non-African populations.“The ancient Siberian was related equally to West European hunter-gatherers, North Asian hunter-gatherers, East Asians, and the indigenous people of the Andaman Islands off South Asia,” Fu said. “The fact that this population separated so early indicates that theories of an early split of people who followed a coastal route to Australia, New Guinea, and coastal Asia are not strongly supported by this data.”The research, the forefront of which was in Germany and involved international collaborators including Reich, was published today in the journal Nature.One important aspect of the research is that it obtained a high-resolution estimate of the mutation rate in humans, Fu said.Prior research had given scientists evidence of two possible rates, one twice as fast as the other. Because of this large range, dates obtained from genetic studies have tended to be quite uncertain. By measuring the number of mutations missing in this individual and comparing with people now, Fu was able to obtain an accurate estimate of the rate that mutations accumulated over time. Her work came down definitively on the side of a slower mutation rate, corresponding to between one to two mutations per genome per year.“This is a huge biological result. It’s very important,” Reich said. “I was a partisan of the fast rates until I saw these results. Qiaomei’s work convinced me that the slow rates were correct.”Reich said the findings on mutation rate have sweeping implications, and provide a basis for reinterpreting key dates in human prehistory. Instead of humans and Neanderthals becoming distinct offshoots sometime between 270,000 and 380,000 years ago, for example, the slower rate would put that shift much further back in time, between 550,000 and 770,000 years ago. Similarly, the slower rate pushes back estimates for the date of the separation of African and non-African populations.“The slow mutation rates indicate that the present-day subdivisions among human populations date back to almost 200,000 years ago, well before the period around 50,000 years ago when the archaeological record documents art and new styles of toolmaking,” Reich said. “The implication is that the spread of modern human behavior must have been cultural, at least in part. Based on the genetic dates, it cannot be the case of a single population that developed modern human behavior spread all around the world replacing the other humans who already lived there.”In examining the ancient Siberian’s ancestry, Fu found about 2.3 percent of his DNA came from Neanderthals. That is a bit higher than found in modern humans living outside Africa today — a level that ranges from 1.7 to 2.1 percent — but too small a difference to be statistically significant, Fu said. Her findings on the date of human-Neanderthal mixing dramatically narrowed the likely range to between 50,000 and 60,000 years ago, a much tighter window than the previous range of between 37,000 and 86,000 years ago.“It’s like going up close to something with a camera,” Reich said of getting high-quality data from a specimen this old. “You just get a much better picture. … You can see big bits of Neanderthal ancestry not yet digested by the process of human biology.”The ancient Siberian’s DNA also contained pieces of Neanderthal DNA that were longer than researchers expected. DNA contributed from any individual is broken into smaller pieces with each passing generation during the normal mixing of maternal and paternal genetic material. The longer stretches of Neanderthal material, Reich and Fu said, may be the signature of mixing between Neanderthals and the ancestors of the Siberian individual within a few dozen generations of when he lived, though additional research is needed to ascertain that.“There are lots of potential confounders, so we wanted to be conservative,” Fu said. “Even if we cannot be sure of whether all the interbreeding occurred at once, the big picture is that we can be sure that the recent ancestors of this individual interbred with Neanderthals.”last_img read more

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Students shelter homeless youth at Y2Y

first_img 1Guests outside 1 Church St. in Harvard Square wait for 7 p.m., when the Y2Y shelter opens and they can be admitted for dinner and the night. Guests can stay for up to 30 consecutive nights, then must re-enter a lottery for additional time. 5Michael displays his two most prized possessions, his phone and passport. Michael traveled to France recently to visit his aunt, who lives in Nice and paid his way. Michael is an avid Patriots fan, and recounts past playoff games with great passion, acting out plays by quarterback Tom Brady. 7Isabel Parkey ’19 prepares freshly picked fall greens from the Harvard Community Garden on Mount Auburn Street. An effort is made to serve fresh vegetables and fruits in season. 4Michael speaks with student director Nathan Cummings ’18 in the privacy of a bunk room for staffers who work the overnight shift. Harvard student directors such as Nathan, as well as Law School students and youth workers from outside agencies, are available nightly to help guests with housing, health, employment, and personal issues. 12Guests Dorell B. (from left) and Janet B. pose with fifth-year Graduate School of Arts and Sciences student Sam Wellington. Dorell is hoping to enroll at Bunker Hill Community College. Janet is studying to be a veterinarian at Roxbury Community College. Both appreciate the help Y2Y gives them with housing and job issues, as well as the stress-free environment there. Sam studies tuberculosis and will be getting her Ph.D. in chemical biology this spring. She volunteers for nearly 30 hours a week, and appreciates the people focus at Y2Y, so different from her lab work. 3Y2Y shelter guest Michael, 20, looks out from his upper-level bunk. He recently interviewed for a job, and hopes to be asked back for a follow-up. 6Julie Park ’17 (from left), Jina John ’17 of Harvard Law School, and Sue Wang ’17 confer while preparing dinner. Local restaurants donate much of the food. Some is simply reheated, or in the case of sandwiches, served cold, but students also get creative with pasta, rice, and vegetable dishes that provide healthy alternatives to ready-made meals. 13A guest is buzzed into the Y2Y homeless shelter in time for dinner, an overnight stay, and some personal attention. For some, the friendly, nurturing atmosphere at the shelter might feel a bit like the home they always wanted but never had.center_img 8Guest Eva D. stands in the Y2Y shelter common space. She experienced domestic violence in her home. Eva, who is transgender, is very active on the part of LBGTQ and homeless youth. She currently works at a call center for several political and advocacy nonprofit organizations. Y2Y Harvard Square is believed to be the nation’s first student-run homeless shelter exclusively for young adults. It is located at 1 Church St., in the heart of the Square, and serves youth from 18 to 24. A Phillips Brooks House Association program, Y2Y was founded by two Harvard College graduates and is staffed mostly by students at the College.To obtain a bed for a 30-night stay, guests enter a lottery. No drugs or alcohol are allowed, and all guests are screened with a security check at the door. Single-night stays are available on a call-in basis. Y2Y can accommodate 27 people overnight, and provides showers, laundry facilities, clothing, computer access, breakfast, and dinner. Beyond basics, Y2Y offers help with housing, finding jobs, legal services, medical care, and provider referrals, and creates a personalized, nurturing atmosphere for its guests. 10Eva D. stands outside the Y2Y homeless shelter with two meals she was given by shelter staff. Her 30-day eligibility is up and she cannot come inside this evening. She will give one meal to a friend who is waiting down the street, then try to find another shelter where she can spend the night. 2Sleeping quarters at the Y2Y homeless shelter. Beds are somewhat enclosed in this three-tiered structure, with ladders providing access to the upper two levels. The arrangement gives a certain degree of privacy while still allowing guests to look out through windows. 11Y2Y shelter guest Dorell B. grew up in Roxbury, graduated from high school in Dorchester, and has attended two community colleges. A graffiti artist and performer of beat music, he is currently working for a ride service in a non-driving capacity. 9Guest Dyaunnhdre O., left, watches case manager Shreya Mathur ’18 look through housing listings. Dyaunnhdre would prefer to live in a familiar neighborhood. last_img read more

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Holy Cross students share power-outage experience

first_imgHoly Cross evacuated students from the College’s residence halls after power went out across campus at about 6:25 a.m. the morning of Jan. 30. An alert was sent out to the community stating that residents would have to evacuate the dorms and board Notre Dame Transpo buses to North Dining Hall.Holy Cross senior Noemi de La Torre said she did not realize the power was not working until she was forced to leave campus.“Moving to Notre Dame when the power went out was kind of overwhelming. I wasn’t awake when the evacuation was initially notified, so when the girls in my dorm woke me up, I kind of freaked out. I didn’t know what to expect in an evacuation, so I grabbed some random things from my room, shoved them in my backpack, put on a few layers of clothes and got on the bus,” de La Torre said.Residence Assistants (RAs) had the responsibility of escorting other students onto the shuttles. Holy Cross junior and RA I.C. Young said that he was awake before the start of the evacuation and noticed the temperature change right away.“I got a text from [Residence Life],” Young said. “I’m an early riser, so I was up at 8 a.m. on my own, but all the RAs were sent a text warning us that we have lost power and will be evacuating if things didn’t change soon. Plus it was freezing so I knew the heat was off.”Freshman Leonardo Ocampo, a freshman at Holy Cross, said the staff tried to make students feel safe during the evacuation.“The process of moving from Holy Cross to Notre Dame was incredibly organized and fast. I was able to get dressed and head down stairs where I was escorted to a bus. It’s certainly an inconvenience getting woken up by your RA pounding at your door because the power is out, but the whole situation was an emergency evacuation, so on those terms it went as smooth as possible,” Ocampo said. “I feel safe knowing that in a case of another unfortunate accident [Holy Cross] has an efficient plan.”Students found different ways to pass time in North Dinning Hall as they waited for power to be restored on campus. De La Torre said she became friends with another student during this time.“My friends went home for the weekend, so I sat at a table with a guy that I had seen around campus that was friends with my friends and talked to him,” de La Torre said. “We got stuck together through the entire evacuation and got to know each other. When we realized we were going to be at Notre Dame for a while, we ate some breakfast and watched Netflix until the evacuation ended.”As a Texas native, de La Torre said she found the extreme weather unfamiliar.“The experience was overwhelming … I had never experienced weather bad enough to cause an evacuation, I had no idea what to bring or how long we were going to be gone, so it was kind of scary,” she added.Power was restored to campus around noon and students returned to their residence halls by 1:30 p.m.Tags: Holy Cross, Polar Vortex, power outagelast_img read more

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Marketing credit unions to millennials: You’re probably doing it wrong

first_imgby: Adrenaline, an Experience Design AgencyMuch has been written about the millennial: who we are; what we like; and why we matter. While analysts and prognosticators seem to grant that the Millennial consumer is driving the next wave of innovation, they have almost no idea how to relate to us in a meaningful way. Thoughtful, well-crafted messages are falling on deaf ears. But why?Adrenaline’s focus has been on communicating with millennials. The structure of the previous sentence is just one clue as to why the agency has been so successful. We don’t communicate to the millennial. We know that developing a relationship with millennials is an ongoing, unfolding conversation that lives in experience. Further, our agency is populated by millennials, so we don’t talk about communicating to them; we are them. We talk about us.As millennials, we were the first to grow up as “digital natives” – with and on technology. To us, technology is ubiquitous, and we spend an average of seven hours a day online. We want both the convenience and immediate access to technology. But it’s not technology for technology’s sake. We believe technology makes our lives easier and connects us to the people and things that are important to us, both near and far. continue reading » 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more