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Metamorphic and thermal history of a fore-arc basin: the Fossil Bluff Group, Alexander Island, Antarctica

first_imgThe Himalia Ridge Formation (Fossil Bluff Group), Alexander Island is a 2.2-km-thick sequence of Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous conglomerates, sandstones and mudstones, derived from an andesitic volcanic arc and deposited in a fore-arc basin. The metamorphic and thermal history of the formation has been determined using authigenic mineral assemblages and vitrinite reflectance measurements. Metamorphic effects include compaction, pore-space reduction, cementation and dissolution and replacement of detrital grains by clay minerals (smectite, illite/smectite, corrensite and kaolinite), calcite, chlorite, laumontite, prehnite, pumpellyite, albite and mica, with less common quartz, haematite, pyrite and epidote. The authigenic mineral assemblages exhibit a depth-dependence, and laumontite and calcite exhibit a strong antipathetic relationship. Detrital organic matter in the argillaceous layers has vitrinite reflectance values (R-o) ranging from 2.3 to 3.7%. This indicates considerable thermal maturation, with a systematic increase in reflectivity with increasing depth. There is good correlation of metamorphic mineral assemblages with chlorite crystallinity and vitrinite reflectance values-all indicating temperatures in the range of 140 +/- 20degreesC at the top of the sequence to 250 +/- 10degreesC at the base of the sequence. The temperatures suggest a geothermal gradient of 36-64degreesC/km and a most likely gradient of 50degreesC/km. It is suggested that this higher-than-average gradient for a fore-arc basin resulted either from rifting during basin formation or from a late-stage arc migration event.last_img read more

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‘I almost died’: David Ortiz gives 1st interview after being shot

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailfstop123/iStock(BOSTON) — Boston Red Sox legend and three-time World Series champion David Ortiz gave his first interview after being shot in the Dominican Republic earlier this year.The retired slugger known as “Big Papi” was shot at the Dial Bar and Lounge in Santo Domingo on June 9. In the interview, he described the moment as surreal and said he wondered if he was going to see the next day.“For the first five seconds, I thought I was having a nightmare … I was feeling something that I had never felt before in my life, and that was to try to stay alive,” Ortiz told Univision in an exclusive interview Friday.Ortiz was temporarily in a coma following complications from the shooting, and he remained in the hospital for nearly two months, undergoing three surgeries. His gunshot wounds caused damage to his liver and his small and large intestine.Ortiz told Univision he’s still trying to process the shooting, and why he, as someone who always tried to get along with everyone, could get caught up in something like that.“I am someone who likes to make friends, I like to be someone who is kind,” Ortiz said. “Someone that gets along with everyone – I am not [a] problematic person. I don’t like problems.”Authorities said Ortiz’s friend, Sixto David Fernandez, was the target — and not Ortiz — but the gunman allegedly told police he got the two confused. The cousin of Fernandez, Victor Hugo Gomez, was arrested on June 28 in the Dominican Republic as the mastermind of the shooting. Hugo Gomez reportedly denied any wrongdoing in July, after a video of him surfaced. Dominican National Police said the investigation is in the “secret phase,” in June but have not provided any recent updates on the case against Huge Gomez.Ortiz said he’s trying to get past the incident.“The only thing that concerned me is that my country advances. That love that people have for you there. It is not a lie,” Ortiz told Univision.Earlier this week Ortiz brought the home crowd at Fenway Park to its feet as he threw out the ceremonial first pitch against his long-time nemesis, the New York Yankees.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. Beau Lund Written bycenter_img September 14, 2019 /Sports News – National ‘I almost died’: David Ortiz gives 1st interview after being shotlast_img read more

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Barron shines in debut, Weber State beats Idaho State 49-21

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPOCATELLO, Idaho (AP) — Bronson Barron passed for 312 yards and four touchdowns in his college debut, and Weber State beat Idaho State 49-21 in the spring season and Big Sky Conference opener for both teams.Josh Davis ran 11 times for 106 yards and a touchdown and caught five passes for 69 yards and a score for the Wildcats.Wyoming transfer Tyler Vander Waal was 17 of 42 for 304 yards passing, three touchdowns and two interceptions in his Bengals debut. Tags: Big Sky/Bronson Barron/Weber State Wildcats Football Written by February 27, 2021 /Sports News – Local Barron shines in debut, Weber State beats Idaho State 49-21 Associated Presslast_img read more

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USA: Defense Acquisition Board Okays Full-Rate Production of Standard Missile-6 (Video)

first_img View post tag: usa View post tag: Okays View post tag: News by topic Share this article A Defense Acquisition Board approved full-rate production of Raytheon Company’s Standard Missile-6. Once operational in 2013, the SM-6 will provide U.S. Navy vessels extended range protection against fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicles and cruise missiles. “SM-6 is a game-changing, transformational fleet defense missile, and we’re on track to reach initial operating capability this year,” said Wes Kremer , Raytheon Missile Systems’ vice president of Air and Missile Defense Systems. “This is a monumental moment for the SM-6 program and signifies a new era of fleet defense for our naval warfighters.”In February, Raytheon delivered the first SM-6 from its new $75 million, 70,000 square-foot SM-6 and Standard Missile-3 all-up-round production facility at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Ala. The facility features advanced tools and the latest processes for missile production, enabling Raytheon to streamline processes, reduce costs and add value for the warfighter. “The first delivery of low-rate initial production rounds to the U.S. Navy was in February 2011, which was six months ahead of contract,” said Mike Campisi , Raytheon’s senior director of Standard Missile-1, -2, and -6 programs. “The first full-rate production Standard Missile-6 is on track for an April 2015 delivery, which is three months ahead of contract.”SM-6 delivers a proven over-the-horizon air defense capability by leveraging the time-tested advantages of the Standard Missile’s airframe and propulsion. The SM-6 uses both active and semi-active guidance modes and advanced fuzing techniques.It incorporates the advanced signal processing and guidance control capabilities from Raytheon’s Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missile.[mappress]Press Release, May 24, 2013; Image: Raytheon View post tag: acquisition View post tag: Defence View post tag: Navy View post tag: Raytheon View post tag: Standard View post tag: boardcenter_img May 24, 2013 Equipment & technology View post tag: Missile-6 USA: Defense Acquisition Board Okays Full-Rate Production of Standard Missile-6 (Video) Back to overview,Home naval-today USA: Defense Acquisition Board Okays Full-Rate Production of Standard Missile-6 (Video) View post tag: Naval View post tag: defense missile View post tag: vessels View post tag: Defenselast_img read more

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Glaston-buried and kilde

first_imgBy Daniel RobertsWhen I was about thirteen I went through a ‘60s phase. I grew my hair and wore a woollen cardigan; I greedily devoured accounts of Jimmy Page riding his motorbike through hotel lobbies and listened to Dark Side of the Moon for hours in the glow of my lava-lamp. And how I wished I could have gone to that crowning event of the hippy era: Woodstock. Not for the acid trips, or the ‘free-love’, you understand, nor perhaps even for the music, but rather for the spirit, that essence of the age that brought so many people together to celebrate music and life. I couldn’t go to Woodstock of course, but there was one place where that spirit seemed to live on, a place of pilgrimage, a music festival with  so much more that devoted punters requested that their ashes be scattered on its site after their deaths. And so experiencing Glastonbury Festival became high on my list of ‘Things To Do Before I Die’. I ditched the cardigan, but not the fascination, so this spring, just like several hundred-thousand other hopefuls, I awoke at a ridiculously early hour, commandeered two computers and a phone and I emerged as one of the lucky purchasers of a golden ticket to Glastonbury.With such high expectations it was perhaps inevitable that the festival would be a bit of a disappointment, and so it proved to be. First of all there was the famous Glastonbury weather. Much as festival-goers love to claim that the mud and rain can’t dampen the fun I couldn’t help spending most of the weekend thinking about how much better it would all be if I wasn’t wet, and the loudest cheers of the festival were reserved not for The Who or the Arctic Monkeys but for the rare glimpses of sunshine that tantalised the crowds before giving way again to the deluge. Second, despite the festival’s reputation as a musical Mecca, the line-up this year was decidedly uninspiring. V stalwarts like James Morrison, The Fratellis and The Kooks rendered the Pyramid stage almost devoid of interest, and neither The Killers nor The Arctic Monkeys managed to justify their position on the bill: the former masked their plodding, hollow ‘anthems’ in pompous bombast while the latter were fishes out of water as headliners. Add to this the fact that all the best music was dispensed with over a few hours on the Friday (Bjork, Hot Chip, M.I.A. Trentemoller and Fat Boy Slim – how about that for a clash…), and one can’t help but think the festival could be helped by some more challenging and edgy bookings in the headline slots.Despite this, there was still much to enjoy. The site was dotted with some fantastic pieces of art: clearly a lot of preparation had gone into the organisation, and the location was unbelievably large: there was always a new area to explore and a delightful surprise round every corner, and given the festival’s stature the joy and pride visible in the performances of many of the newer British bands made for some electrifying concerts.But ultimately the Stonehenge installation constructed from portaloos by artist Banksy summed up Glasto’s predicament: at first Banksy’s guerrilla graffiti struck a chord with its fresh perspective and challenging themes, but now he sells paintings to Hollywood stars for tens of thousands of pounds. Similarly the popularity of what was formerly a genuinely meaningful and politically charged gathering has proved to be the festival’s downfall. With the masses came homogenisation and now there is just very little magic to be found in the ‘green fields’ at Glasto. Don’t get me wrong, Glastonbury is anything but a bad festival, and it is by far the best of the major British offerings. The problem for Glastonbury is that in this age of increasing demand for the live music experience the options increase as well, and with some of the alternatives on offer abroad it’s hard not to see why soggy Glasto begins to look less appealing. Benicàssim offers glorious sunshine and a pristine Spanish beach.  Norway’s Hove Festival plays out against a backdrop of stunning mountains and fjords. And Eastern European festivals are becoming an increasingly popular budget option.One such foreign alternative, and the one that completed my festival summer, is Denmark’s Roskilde. Located thirty miles from Copenhagen the festival arguably has an even richer history than its English counterpart. Founded in 1971 by a couple of high school students this non-profit event was modelled on the peace and love ethos of Woodstock and has a focus on recycling and the environment, plus an eclectic musical smorgasbord showcasing the best talent from Scandinavia and beyond. All in all it was, whisper it, better than Glastonbury.There’s the tantalising way the organisers add a few bands to the line-up every week from March or so, leaving you desperate to see if your favourite band will be one of the announced every Wednesday. There’s the wonderful refund system, under which beer bottles, cans and cups can be exchanged for money, meaning that not only can you buy yourself a meal by going around picking up a few cups, but the festival is noticeably cleaner and tidier into the bargain. There’s the fact that the Main Stage is called the Orange Stage not because it has anything to do with a phone company, but because it’s, well, orange. There’s the train service that goes right from the festival site to the town, or even to Copenhagen, for a pound or two a pop, there’s the swimming lake, the cinema, the naked run (which does exactly what it says on the tin, the prize being tickets to the next years bash). Not only does Roskilde have four days of fantastic music to Glastonbury’s three, but the main event is preceded by a five day ‘warm-up’: you pitch your tent, meet your neighbours, enjoy some smaller bands and generally have an unbelievably good time. It’s the atmosphere at Roskilde that makes it truly memorable: the audience at the festival is significantly more multicultural and eclectic than its British equivalents. Glastonbury may have its hippy enclave, but in truth the crowds it attracts these days come from a relatively narrow demographic. Our campsite at Roskilde was populated by Swedes, I chatted to Australians in the queue to get in, an Italian called Paolo kept us awake with his broken but noisy English. We were also paid a visit by a dazed looking Norwegian clad in rainbow spandex and flying goggles who introduced himself as Ola and proudly showed all comers how he could almost do the splits, and I discussed the significant merits of The Whitest Boy Alive’s dream pop with a bloke from Leeds dressed as a banana. The music was great as well: headliners Bjork, Muse, The Who, and Queens of the Stone Age provided familiar thrills, and the festival is the Scandinavian equivalent of Glasto for emerging talent; a host of up and coming Nordic acts gave their all, Datarock, Band Ane, Peter Bjorn And John, 120 Days, Jens Lekman and Mando Diao providing just a few of the more memorable shows.‘Well’, I hear you say, ‘you clearly only enjoyed it more because of the awful weather at Glastonbury’. Not so. This Roskilde was subject to 95mm of rain, more than double the previous record (they even sell t-shirts emblazoned with the legend ‘Roskilde 2007: I Did All 8 Days’), but it just didn’t seem to matter. I’d love to give Glasto another try some time, but next year, rather than frantically scrabbling for a golden ticket to Somerset; I will be making my way to a little slice of wet and beery heaven in an unremarkable corner of Denmark.last_img read more

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Putting Twitter to the test

first_imgThe timely and effective use of social media in the hours and days following the Boston Marathon bombings may serve as a model for other law enforcement agencies in the United States, according to a report published as part of the New Perspectives in Policing Series by the Program in Criminal Justice Policy and Management at Harvard Kennedy School (HKS).The new report, “Social Media and Police Leadership: Lessons from Boston,” spotlights the ways in which the Boston Police Department (BPD) successfully leveraged its social media platform throughout the investigation to keep the community informed and engaged. The report is co-authored by former Boston Police Commissioner Edward Davis, who is currently a visiting fellow at the Institute of Politics at HKS.“The Boston Police Department has long embraced both community policing and the use of social media,” the report begins. “The department put its experience to good and highly visible use in April 2013 during the dramatic, rapidly developing investigation that followed the deadly explosion of two bombs at the finish line of the Boston Marathon.”Davis and co-authors Alejandro A. Alves and David Alan Sklansky identify several key moments following the explosions when the BPD turned to Twitter to communicate critical information. Within one hour of the bombings, they explain, the department had sent out a tweet confirming what had happened along Boylston Street.Ed Davis on social media’s role after the Boston Marathon bombingsFormer Boston Police Commissioner Edward Davis discusses the critical role social media played following the Boston Marathon bombings, becoming the most effective way for law enforcement to communicate with the community.“In the ensuing hours, the department used its official Twitter account to request public assistance; to keep the public and media informed about road closures, news conferences, and police activities; to reassure the public and express sympathy to the victims and their families; and critically, within two hours of the explosions, to give the public accurate information about the casualty toll and the status of the investigation,” they write.The department’s official Twitter account was overseen by BPD’s public information bureau chief, who with the assistance of several others, operated @bostonpolice as a 24-hour “digital hub” for communicating updated information and for correcting misinformation reported by other sources.“BPD tweets rapidly became the most trusted source of information about the status of the investigation and were often retweeted hundreds, thousands of tens of thousands of times,” the authors explain.The effective use of social media by the BPD in this case was largely due to the fact that the department had spent considerable time and effort for many years prior to the bombings in building trust with its audiences, Davis and his co-authors explain. In addition to @bostonpolice, the commissioner and his superintendents maintained personal Twitter accounts.“The promise of social media for policing is not to transform or add to the work of law enforcement but to emphasize the deep connection with the community that has always been the focus of good police work,” the authors conclude. “One of the key lessons of community policing is that effective partnership with the community requires the police not only to talk but also to listen, and social media offer the police such a platform.”Davis was the commissioner of the Boston Police Department for seven years, retiring in November 2013. Alves, who earned an M.P.P. degree from the Kennedy School in 2012, is a policy adviser and chief of staff in the Massachusetts State Senate and an officer in the Army National Guard. Sklansky is the Yosef Osheawich Professor of Law, University of California, Berkeley, School of Law.The New Perspectives in Policing series is published in conjunction with the Harvard Kennedy School Executive Session on Policing and Public Safety, a project funded by the National Institute of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice.To read the full report, Social Media and Police Leadership.pdf.last_img read more

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RecSports offers free, trial classes

first_imgRecSports had a problem. Four years ago, students were dropping out of fitness classes because the classes weren’t what they expected or wanted. That changed when the department began offering a week of free fitness classes at the start of every semester. Shellie Dodd-Bell, RecSports fitness and instruction program coordinator, said when she first arrived in 2007, RecSports was giving students a lot of refunds for fitness classes. “So we began offering sample classes, which gives students an opportunity to feel things out before they commit,” she said. The sample class program has been very successful, with some 1,200 students taking part in over 50 free fitness classes offered in one week, Dodd-Bell said. Students from freshmen to seniors make use of the free classes, and their fitness levels are as varied as their ages. Linda Hardy, an 11-year veteran of RecSports yoga instruction, taught a sample class  Wednesday to a mixture of student abilities. “One girl came up to me before class to ask about becoming a yoga instructor here at Notre Dame,” Hardy said. “A handful of students had never done yoga before.” The sample class did not get through every yoga pose she had planned, but Hardy is glad that she was able to offer her class for a trial run. “The free sample probably promotes the class more than paying for it right up front,” Hardy said. “It helps the students adjust to a schedule and lets them pick and choose the best class and instructor for them.” The students in Hardy’s class also enjoyed sampling how the class fits into their schedules and exercise plans. “I’m glad I get to figure out if I like the class before making a commitment,” Elizabeth Benson, an off-campus senior, said. “It also helps to try out different instructors.” Freshman Jessica Schaefer was glad she could add yoga class to her schedule during her first week of college. “It’s a good chance to relax in the crazy start to the school year,” Schaefer said. “Now that I’ve been to the class, I can see that it would be worth it to pay the fee, to actually sign up.” Hardy’s sample yoga class had 14 students during the busy noon hour, a number that impressed some of the students. “I’m really impressed by how many people are involved in the fitness classes and other physical fitness stuff on campus,” Schaefer said, Although RecSports advertises for its sample fitness classes, many of the attendees hear about the opportunity by word-of-mouth. “My sister had taken yoga before and I decided to take the class with her,” Benson said. Meanwhile, Dodd-Bell offered some advice to students interested in attending a sample RecSports class, especially the popular Step, Sculpt and Pilates classes which have limited equipment. “Come early,” Dodd-Bell said. “The classes are first come, first served.” Above all, Dodd-Bell said, students should use the sample class week to find a fitness class that is “just right for them.”last_img read more

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Notre Dame announces new University trustee, fellow

first_imgThe Notre Dame Board of Trustees appointed Fr. Daniel G. Groody as a fellow and trustee Friday, a University press released announced Thursday. Groody, a prolific author and filmmaker who works at the University an associate professor of theology and global affairs, replaces Fr. Timothy Scully, who served as a trustee for 18 years and a fellow for 16.As one of the University’s Fellows — which consists of six lay peoples and six priests form the Congregation of Holy Cross — Groody will help elect members of the Board of Trustees and has the ability to “adopt and amend the bylaws” of the University, the release said. The Fellows are also responsible for maintaining the Catholic character of the University.Groody graduated from Notre Dame in 1986 and holds a masters of divinity degree as well as a licentiate in sacred theology from the Jesuit School of Theology. Groody received his doctorate in theology at the Graduate Theological Union.As an author and filmmaker, Groody’s work focuses on the theology of migration and refugees issues. From 2007 to 2008, he worked as a visiting research fellow at Oxford University’s Refugee Studies Centre. In 2010, Groody received the Catholic Charities Centennial medal.Groody received the Rev. Edmund P. Joyce, C.S.C., Award for Sustained Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching in 2011 for his work in the theology department.Tags: Board of Trustees, Daniel Groody, Notre Dame fellows, Timothy Scullylast_img read more

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End appears near for Navajo Generating Station

first_imgEnd appears near for Navajo Generating Station FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Arizona Republic:It’s now a lock that the biggest coal plant in the West and the mine that feeds it will close in December 2019, if not earlier, and there is no proposal from anyone to stop it and little hope it would ever reopen.Middle River Power of Illinois and its affiliated New York investment firm, Avenue Capital, were considering taking over the plant, but they announced Thursday those plans would not work out.The news prompted a desperate request from Peabody Energy, which operates the Kayenta coal mine on Navajo and Hopi land and will have nowhere else to send the shiny black rock when the plant closes.But short of a heavy-handed intervention by the federal government, the deal with Middle River Power offered the last, best hope to keep jobs for the approximately 750 mostly Native Americans who work at the plant and mine when they are fully operational.The four utility owners — Salt River Project, Arizona Public Service Co., Tucson Electric Power and NV Energy —  voted in February 2017 to close the plant in favor of cheaper power from natural-gas plants.SRP has already begun to wind down operations at the plant, transferring workers to other openings at the utility where possible and replacing them with contractors.The utility’s lease allows it to continue running the plant through Dec. 22, 2019, and the company expects a small staff of mostly contractors running the facility by that point, if it even runs that long.More: Death of Navajo coal plant deal will have wide-ranging consequences for tribeslast_img read more

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Even after audit is complete, still work to be done

first_imgOne of the most important pieces of an effective compliance program is the audit function. Audits may help to identify individual compliance concerns or general gaps in a credit union’s program. However, the work is not done just because the audit is complete.Prompt corrective action should be executed regarding each concern identified in the audit. Every credit union should develop a process appropriate for its level of resources; however, the following is a general outline of recommended actions.Step 1: Defining the cause The credit union should determine if the concern identified in the audit was a singular occurrence or if a gap in procedures may exist. An identified issue may be the result of many factors, such as general oversight, insufficient training or systems mapping. Analyzing the source of the error will aid the credit union in determining the appropriate corrective action.Step 2: Assigning the resolutionOnce the origin of the issue has been identified, the responsibility for resolution should be assigned to an individual or committee of individuals with the resources and authority to resolve the error. The assigned party will be responsible for ensuring an effective resolution occurs.To mitigate any continual compliance risk, a due date should be established. If the corrective action will be part of a long-term process, it may be prudent to establish periodic checkpoints to ensure progress is continually made toward the resolution.Step 3: Performing a follow-up reviewWhen the corrective action is complete, an additional review should be conducted to verify the remedial action rectified the issue identified in the original audit. Assuming the item has been resolved, the credit union should document the result of its efforts.Documentation should include the identity of the individual or committee that resolved the issue, a brief description of the action that was taken, the date on which it was completed and the results of the follow-up review. The documentation should be maintained for review by auditors and/or examiners.Effective completion of this process will not only reduce ongoing compliance risk, but demonstrate the credit union’s commitment to evaluating its own compliance, correcting any identified errors and providing the highest level of member service. The results of this three-step post-audit process will be observed by staff, members and importantly, examiners. 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Brian Godwin Brian D. Godwin serves as Director of Regulatory Compliance for PolicyWorks. He is responsible for overseeing the delivery of PolicyWorks compliance consulting and review services to credit union clients, managing … Web: www.policyworksllc.com Detailslast_img read more