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Powerspeed Electrical Limited (PWS.zw) 2020 Annual Report

first_imgPowerspeed Electrical Limited (PWS.zw) listed on the Zimbabwe OTC under the Retail sector has released it’s 2020 annual report.For more information about Powerspeed Electrical Limited (PWS.zw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Powerspeed Electrical Limited (PWS.zw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Powerspeed Electrical Limited (PWS.zw)  2020 annual report.Company ProfileIMPORTANT THE EXTRAORDINARY GENERAL MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS HELD ON 14 DECEMBER 2020 RESOLVED TO DELIST FROM THE ZIMBABWE STOCK EXCHANGE. OTC TRADING OF SHARES IS UNDER IMPLEMENTATION. READ MORE >> Powerspeed Electrical is a leading supplier of electrical, hardware, building and home improvement products and services; trading through its own chain of hardware retail outlets known as Electrosales Hardware. The company supplies electrical products and solutions to the painting, plumbing, electrical, building, hand and power tools, outdoor and gardening, and automotive industries in Zimbabwe. Powerspeed Engineering is a subsidiary company involved in rewinding electric motors, supplying industrial fans and ducting for commercial and industrial applications, fabrication of non-standard steel products and structures, and commercial and industrial light fittings, heating elements, distribution boards and domestic irons. The engineering division is the amalgamation of three leading industrial engineering companies; Airflo, Relmo and ELS.last_img read more

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Texas diocese launches collaborative wildfire relief effort

first_img Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Texas diocese launches collaborative wildfire relief effort Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 center_img By Luke BlountPosted Jan 31, 2012 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Collierville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Press Release Service Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL [Episcopal Diocese of Texas] Officials in the Episcopal Diocese of Texas announced Jan. 30 that a coordinated effort to help Bastrop County families recover from last September’s wildfires has begun. Volunteers and donations are needed to help rebuilding efforts.The diocese’s Texas Episcopal Disaster Relief and Development (TEDRD) is working with the United Methodist Committee on Relief and Presbyterian Disaster Assistance to start “Faith Village,” a housing center in Smithville, Texas that will house around 40 volunteers in a building donated by Smithville Baptist Church.The Rev. Gill Keyworth, diocesan emergency response coordinator, is collaborating with local groups and the Bastrop County Long Term Recovery Committee to create a strategic plan for relief efforts. Keyworth, a deacon at Emmanuel Church, Houston, has spent three days a week for the past few months in Bastrop. For her, the goal is teamwork.“We’re not worrying about whether we are Lutherans or Episcopalians or Presbyterians. Everyone is working together,” Keyworth said.In September 2011, Texans watched as 1670 homes and 35,000 acres of land burned in Bastrop County. Today, new construction is beginning, but there are still stark reminders of the past. What was once a beautiful, forested escape is now a landscape of blackened, leafless trees, rising up from a gray, barren ground.A monstrous pile of rubble sits on the south side of Highway 71, constantly emptied and refilled with the stone and brick remains of homes. Around the county, crews work constantly to grind the dead trees into mulch, a process that will take years to complete. But behind the dark exterior, hope abounds. In just four months since Texas’ most devastating fire season, Bastrop County volunteers have pushed to organize a rebuilding movement.The Episcopal Diocese of Texas immediately responded in the days after the fire. The diocese has raised more than $100,000, including $17,000 in gift cards for fire victims. Those funds were instrumental in helping families that had lost everything with essential needs.Now, the mission has shifted focus to rebuilding homes, and faith-based organizations across Bastrop County are teaming up to begin the effort. When volunteers arrive, they will report to a central construction coordinator, who will use construction foremen to oversee specific projects. TEDRD has hired Gary Davis to act as one construction foreman. Davis previously served as the construction manager for Texas Episcopal Disaster Relief in Galveston following Hurricane Ike. His wife, Gena, is the vicar of Grace Church, Houston.Faith Village is now open for registration here. Currently, much of the work still revolves around clean up. Many homes still lie in debris on the slabs where they once stood. Some items like pottery or metal objects can be seen lying broken amid the stone and brick.Once the clean-up nears completion, construction projects will begin in earnest. TEDRD will use a grant from Episcopal Relief & Development as well as foundation grants to begin the relief project, but much more funding is needed to help an estimated 400 families that need assistance. Visit the Wildfire Relief Page to learn more about how to help.Church provides support for communityThe Rev. Lisa Hines was in California when she learned her home was in the pathway of a fire. She flew home not knowing whether her home was still standing.“I never went home,” Hines said. By the time she returned, her husband, Chris, had already evacuated, leaving almost everything behind.As rector of Calvary Church, Bastrop, Hines spent the next few days ensuring the safety of her parishioners. At one point the fire came so close to the downtown area of Bastrop that Hines packed the Eucharistic vessels into her car, in case she had to evacuate. After several weeks, the fire was officially declared extinguished on Oct. 10. The church and downtown survived, but 43 families from Calvary Church and School lost their homes, including the Hines family.“In some ways it gave me a little advantage because I was one of them,” Hines said. “By virtue of showing up I had great moral authority.”“A lot of times we use the phrase ‘I know how you feel,’ but Lisa could honestly say it,” Keyworth said.Hines sold the property where her old home once stood and is moving closer to the church. Many other families from Calvary are still searching for permanent housing. Some are living in FEMA trailers; some are renting and others are staying with family. Many have had to move several times since the fire.Over the Christmas holidays, Hines helped some families that couldn’t afford presents for their children. But even the families that were financially stable struggled with the emotional toll the fire had taken.“It is a continuing source of stress throughout the community,” Hines said. “There is no question about that. Christmas was a hard time for families. Christmas is one of those times that strings the years together. It helps you remember all of the other Christmases when you pull those mementos out, and now there is this big gap.”Though most fire victims have resolved to stay in Bastrop, Hines said at least five families decided to leave the area altogether. Calvary has been able to help many families get back on their feet including one parishioner whose son needs a heart transplant. Hines helped him with a down payment for his home.“We’ve helped as many non-parishioners as parishioners,” Hines said. “But our biggest needs now are volunteers and money for construction materials. The long-term recovery of Bastrop depends on recreating a tax-base for the county because that is what runs the public school system.”To learn more about how to help Bastrop County recover, visit www.epicenter.org/wildfire-relief.— Luke Blount is staff writer and communications specialist for the Episcopal Diocese of Texas. Rector Belleville, IL Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, ILlast_img read more

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‘Espadas en Azadones’

first_img‘Espadas en Azadones’ El ‘Huerto de la Paz’ de Indianápolis busca restaurar y nutrir a la comunidad Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Voluntarios de iglesia episcopal de San Albano trabajan, a principios de junio, en torno a cruces conmemorativas en el trasplante de posturas de tomate. Foto de Mike Scime/San Albano.Nota de la redacción: Esta es el último artículo de una serie sobre congregaciones de la Iglesia Episcopal que participan en iniciativas de agricultura comunitaria.  Otros artículos de la serie pueden encontrarse aquí.[Episcopal News Service] Es difícil obviar el ministerio que está creciendo en el exterior de la iglesia episcopal de San Albano [St. Alban’s Episcopal Church] en Indianápolis.Al pasar la calle 46 rumbo a la avenida Anderson, cualquier transeúnte —bien comido o hambriento, devoto o espiritualmente inseguro, esté luchando por recuperarse o sea propenso a la violencia— se ve confrontado por un espectáculo sombrío y esperanzador a un tiempo: docenas de cruces blancas se levantan en conmemoración a los muertos, al tiempo que se ven rodeadas por la abundancia de la Tierra de Dios, cultivos que terminarán por proporcionarles alimentos frescos a un barrio que tiene gran necesidad de ellos.Cada cruz plantada en ese campo lateral de la iglesia representa una de las víctimas asesinadas de la ciudad. En algunos casos, las cruces mismas se han convertido en herramientas del hortelano, sosteniendo enredaderas de guisantes y hierbas más altas, como el eneldo. El objetivo de la iglesia, con ayuda de una subvención de la Ofrenda Unida de Gracias, o UTO por su sigla en inglés, es cosechar 10.000 libras de productos de este antiguo terreno de béisbol para fines de la temporada de cultivo y distribuirlas entre varias despensas de víveres locales.Cruces blancas que representan las víctimas de asesinato en la ciudad se ven en julio en medio de plantaciones de maíz y otros cultivos en el huerto exterior de la iglesia episcopal de San Albano en Indianápolis. Foto de Mike Scime/San Albano.“De manera que uno tiene esta imagen de la resurrección; donde había un terreno baldío representativo de la muerte, ahora se está volviendo algo que vive… algo que va a beneficiar a la comunidad que ha sufrido por los asesinatos”, dijo el Rdo. Mike Scime, diácono de San Albano y codirector del huerto.El programa agrícola ha suscitado indagaciones de otras congregaciones en Indianápolis y más allá, en tanto los organizadores tienen la mirada puesta en el objetivo a largo plazo de mejorar las opciones nutricionales y de compra de víveres de los vecinos de la iglesia.Este ministerio ha tomado años en crearse, y su nombre, que evoca un pasaje de Miqueas, apunta a múltiples influencias y misiones: Huerto de la Paz ‘Espadas en Azadones’.El proyecto intenta mostrar que, con ayuda de Dios, la “esterilidad causada por la violencia” puede transformarse “en alimento dador de vida” para los vecinos más pobres de la iglesia.La violencia era una historia recurrente en 2014 y de nuevo en 2015 en Indianápolis. Luego de más de 130 homicidios en 2014, la ciudad alcanzó un nuevo récord siniestro el año pasado con 144 homicidios, entre ellos el caso de un niño de 10 años muerto por un pariente en un oficio de recordación y otro caso que conllevó el descubrimiento de cuatro personas muertas en una casa que había sido blanco de un allanamiento delictivo.San Albano está localizada en la parte este de Indianápolis, donde ha tenido lugar un gran número de asesinatos. Los miembros de la congregación provienen de un área geográfica mucho más grande, pero en el barrio en torno a la iglesia, es difícil encontrar productos frescos, dijo Sarah Archer, miembro de San Albano, quien ayudó a crear la iniciativa Espadas en Azadones.“Nuestro barrio es lo que se llama a falta de una definición mejor un ‘desierto alimentario’, que la Administración de Alimentos y Fármacos (FDA por su sigla en inglés) define como un área donde las tiendas de víveres se encuentran a unos dos kilómetros de distancia de la mayoría de las viviendas, y en la que los residentes terminan por comprar toda clase de alimentos en tiendas mixtas, que casi nunca venden productos fresco, dijo Archer, miembro de la junta parroquial y subdirectora del proyecto.Además de una misión meritoria, la iglesia cuenta con un recurso clave: tres terrenos de béisbol sin usar.El ministerio de béisbol de la iglesia había terminado hace varios años, y los líderes de la congregación llevaban mucho tiempo debatiendo qué hacer con los terrenos. Plantar un huerto de frutales demoraría mucho en producir. También se discutió la creación de un huerto donde los miembros de la comunidad pudieran alquilar parcelas, pero ese plan conllevaría dificultades administrativas.“Sabíamos que teníamos que encontrarle otro uso a esa propiedad”, dijo Scime, y el repunte de la violencia condujo al comienzo de un plan. “Algunas personas querían hacer algo que atrajera la atención de la comunidad al número de asesinatos”.Una respuesta a la violencia se incorporó en la decisión de la iglesia de tomarse el trabajo de cultivar el terreno, y Scime y otros líderes de la iglesia vieron sus énfasis de justicia, paz y comunidad  coincidir con la misión del programa de la Iglesia Episcopal subvencionado por la UTO.En mayo, las cruces de recordación se usan para conectar cordeles que sostienen los brotes de guisantes en el huerto de la iglesia episcopal de San Albano ‘Espadas para Azadones’. Foto de Mike Scime/San Albano.“El huerto nos dio una oportunidad de hacer también algo positivo en la comunidad donde reuniríamos a personas de todo el barrio y de todas las procedencias […] en beneficio de la comunidad donde estaban ocurriendo los asesinatos”, dijo Scime.San Albano comenzó a trazar planes para cultivar uno de los terrenos de béisbol de 400 metros cuadrados. En diciembre de 2014, Scime, con ayuda de Archer, presentó una solicitud para una subvención de la UTO de alrededor de $16.000 que, al combinarse con otras subvenciones y donaciones, se usaría para comprar equipo, contratar un administrador y mantener el huerto activo y próspero.Si bien la iglesia esperó hasta el año pasado para tomar una decisión relativa a la solicitud de la subvención de la UTO, se plantaron melones en aproximadamente el 30 por ciento del terreno para probar la calidad del suelo. Resultó adecuada, y todo el cambo se labró a fin de prepararlo para la siembra la primavera siguiente.Después de que aprobaran la subvención de la UTO, la iglesia celebró una ceremonia en diciembre pasado para dedicar el Huerto de la Paz. Asistieron unas cien personas, entre ellas el jefe de la policía municipal y representantes de las despensas de alimentos asociadas con la iglesia.Para entonces, Indianápolis se encaminaba a superar su propio récord de 1998 de 143 asesinatos, y las cruces blancas que representaban las víctimas muertas en 2015 llenaban el terreno baldío de la iglesia.“Una vez que se plantaran todas las cruces, para fines de diciembre, y mirar a través de ese campo de cruces llamaba poderosamente la atención”, dijo Archer, que trabaja como enfermera de salud pública.En la primavera, la iglesia utilizó el dinero de la subvención para contratar a Tate Nielsen como director del huerto a jornada completa para la temporada de crecimiento de 2016. Él desarrolló un plan para unos 20 cultivos, entre ellos tomates, lechugas, zanahorias, cebollas, calabacines, melones, maíz y frijoles. Los cultivos mismos se convirtieron en un anuncio publicitario para el ministerio que se llevaba a cabo.“Queríamos hacerlo visualmente atractivo para que la gente se asomara y se sorprendiera de lo que pasaba y realmente se comprometiera con el huerto”, explicó Nielsen.A mediados de julio, ya se habían cosechado 544 kilogramos de productos frescos, lechugas en su mayoría. Cuando los cultivos más pesados se recojan más tarde en la estación, la granja espera alcanzar su meta de 4.535 kilogramos para donar a las despensas de víveres locales, dijo él.Al mismo tiempo, el huerto ya suscitado el apoyo de muchas partes, y cuenta con 43 voluntarios que han puesto en total más de 320 horas de trabajo para llevar el alimento desde la semilla hasta la mesa.La iglesia ya está planificando para el próximo año. Llevó aproximadamente $25.000 iniciar la plantación del huerto, pero el costo anual se calcula en $15.000 —el empleo de Nielsen es sólo temporero, y el huerto se espera que continúe el año próximo con solamente un administrador de media jornada. Antes de decidir qué se plantará el año próximo, se están entrevistando a más de 100 despensas de víveres para determinar qué tipos de productos prefieren, dijo Archer.Más adelante en el futuro, la iglesia espera colaborar con otras organizaciones locales para animar a más compañías de productos alimentarios a abrir tiendas de víveres en éste y otros barrios de Indianápolis a fin de abordar el problema de los desiertos de alimentos.En el ínterin, la violencia ha continuado en 2016 —“hay 71 cruces en nuestro huerto”, dijo Scime un lunes por la mañana de este mes—, aunque Indianápolis no se encamina a igualar el récord de muertes del año pasado. En presencia de esa violencia, las esperanzas de San Albano es la de ser un “faro de luz”, dijo Scime, en tanto progresa con su ministerio agrícola.No podría haber sucedido sin el apoyo del programa de la UTO, añadió Scime. “Tenemos un compromiso y una creencia firmes de que su inversión inicial aquí resultará en algo que se prolongará en el futuro”.— David Paulsen es un escritor independiente radicado en Milwaukee, Wisconsin, y miembro de la iglesia episcopal de la Trinidad [Trinity Episcopal Church] in Wauwatosa. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events Featured Jobs & Calls Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Job Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Martinsville, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Tags Rector Pittsburgh, PA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Rector Albany, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate Diocese of Nebraska TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Press Release Service Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Por David Paulsen Posted Jul 25, 2016 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Church-Community Agriculture Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, IDlast_img read more

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Episcopal congregation near death row prison braces for first federal…

first_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC Advocacy Peace & Justice, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Events Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Press Release Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Jobs & Calls Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ A corrections vehicle patrols near the Federal Corrections Complex in Terre Haute, Indiana, in May. Photo: Reuters[Episcopal News Service] Federal executions are scheduled to resume next month for the first time since 2003, at the prison in Terre Haute, Indiana, and the nearby congregation of St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church has joined other faith groups and anti-death penalty advocates in leading discussions on the issue.St. Stephen’s hosted a forum on Oct. 29 featuring a retired executioner and a murder victim’s family member. The Rev. Drew Downs, the church’s rector, has blogged on the issue and plans to attend a prayer vigil on Dec. 9, the morning of the first scheduled execution. Long-time parishioners still have vivid memories of the frenzy in 2001 when Timothy McVeigh was executed there.“It was a very tense time,” said Gene England, 79, a death penalty opponent who has been a St. Stephen’s member for 50 years. Reporters and activists on both sides of the issue swarmed the city before McVeigh’s execution, fueling some conversations at the congregation’s parish picnic that year.England, in an interview with Episcopal News Service, recalled that even some who opposed the death penalty thought it might be justified for McVeigh, who killed 168 in the 1995 bombing of the federal building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. But since then, England thinks many of his fellow parishioners “have come to feel that they just can’t support capital punishment because of their strong feeling against taking a life of any kind.”Not taking a life of any kind is the official stance of The Episcopal Church. It has spoken against the death penalty since 1958, when General Convention passed a resolution asserting a theological basis for the belief that “the life of an individual is of infinite worth in the sight of Almighty God; and the taking of such a human life falls within the providence of Almighty God and not within the right of man.” General Convention has reaffirmed its opposition to capital punishment several times since then, most recently with a resolution passed in 2018.“It has never meant a bit of sense that we ought to kill somebody to prove that killing is wrong,” Downs said in a blog post last month. “And as a person of faith, that is even more the point.”When reached by phone, Downs told ENS he thinks his congregation is in some ways still in shock at the decision to resume executions at the federal prison in Terre Haute, where most of the 62 federal death row prisoners are held. “The timeframe has been so quick that we haven’t had much of an opportunity to wrestle with it,” said Downs, who has served at St. Stephen’s for five years. Some of his parishioners remember the “psychic effect” that the sudden attention had on the community in 2001.This year, Downs and other faith leaders in the city have partnered with a group called Terre Haute Death Penalty Resistance to coordinate events in response to the federal developments.The death penalty still is in effect in 29 states, but the number of executions nationwide has dropped since 1999, from a high of 98 that year to 20 in 2016, according to the Death Penalty Information Center. The U.S. government hasn’t carried out an execution since 2003, partly due to concerns about the effectiveness and availability of the three-drug cocktail used in lethal injections.Federal charges are tried in federal courts, where certain crimes under U.S. law carry with them the possibility of the death penalty at facilities administered separately from state prisons. The Justice Department under President Donald Trump announced in July this year it would resume executing prisoners on the federal death row using the single drug pentobarbital.“We owe it to the victims and their families to carry forward the sentence imposed by our justice system,” Attorney General William Barr said in a written statement announcing the decision.The Episcopal Church, through its Washington, D.C.-based Office of Government Relations, condemned the Trump administration’s decision in a statement that argued killing as retribution “for even the most heinous crimes” is wrong.“The death penalty is not theologically justifiable, in part because it is not necessary for the protection of innocent people, and the state cannot morally justify killing for the sake of vengeance,” the church said while invoking Christ’s atonement for all sin through his own death. “The premeditated and unnecessary killing of a person is unchristian and beyond the legitimate powers of the state.”England said he agrees with the church’s stance and supports Episcopal advocacy on the issue, and he shares the concerns of those who question “the fairness of who is executed, who isn’t executed.” Critics of the criminal justice system argue that poor defendants are more likely to be convicted and sentenced because they can’t afford better legal representation.The Oct. 29 forum at St. Stephen’s, “The Human Toll of Capital Punishment,” featured a screening of the movie “The Executioner’s Shadow” and drew about 40 attendees, and other groups are hosting events in the city in the coming weeks to spark further discussion.A free event on Dec. 8, the eve of the upcoming federal execution, will be held at St. Benedict Catholic Church in Terre Haute and will feature a full lineup of speakers from secular and faith-based groups that oppose the death penalty. Early the next morning, Downs plans to join a group gathering at a city park that will make its way to the prayer vigil outside the federal prison, south of downtown.At dawn, Daniel Lewis Lee is scheduled to be executed for killing a family of three, including an 8-year-old girl, in 1999.Downs recently spoke to the prison chaplain about the prison’s preparations for the execution, and “he said they were getting started really from the day it was announced.” As a rector, Downs is focused on the pastoral needs of his congregation and community as they approach Dec. 9, “bracing for what’s to come.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Associate Rector Columbus, GA center_img Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Death Penalty Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Tags Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Albany, NY By David PaulsenPosted Nov 18, 2019 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Bath, NC Episcopal congregation near death row prison braces for first federal execution since 2003 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN last_img read more

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Rugby HQ Plays of the Month for February PLUS the Wraparound, week 2

first_imgThursday Feb 26, 2015 Rugby HQ Plays of the Month for February PLUS the Wraparound, week 2 Many of you have been vocal about missing the Plays of the Week features that have pretty much been an institution at Fox Sports for the last however many years, so the good news is that today they’ve brought out a special Plays of the Month, featuring the best, worst and ugliest from February. Look out for massive hits, great tries and of course some random titbits.After the jump, on the next page, you can view the latest weekly feature from Sean and the guys at Rugby HQ, The Wraparound, week two. It features the funniest and strangest moments from the world of rugby, so is also worth watching for a bit of a laugh.You can still view the brilliant Plays of the Week archivesADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Plays of the Week Related Articles 123 WEEKS AGO WATCH: France destroy Wales in Women’s Six… 138 WEEKS AGO Waikato winger scores four tries in epic… 304 WEEKS AGO The Wraparound from Rugby HQ – Week 27 From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingGranny Stuns Doctors by Removing Her Wrinkles with This Inexpensive TipSmart Life Reports30+ Everyday Items With A Secret Hidden PurposeNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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Authorities arrest husband of teacher found dead in Marfa

first_img Pinterest Local NewsCrime Pinterest Jeff Davis County Sheriff logo The husband of a Marfa High School teacher who was fatally stabbed was arrested Monday in connection with her death.A news release sent out by the Jeff Davis County Sheriff’s Office stated 31-year-old Sophia Eleanor Sullivan was found dead inside her Fort Davis home Friday night. Her husband, 30-year-old Daniel Merrill Sullivan told deputies he found his wife, whom he believed to have been murdered, on the floor of their home and she appeared to be deceased, the release stated.Sullivan told deputies he then grabbed his 7-year-old son and ran out of the home to the neighbor’s house, where he called 9-1-1, the release stated.Sullivan remained outside with deputies while Sheriff Bill Kitts, Chief Deputy Jerry Walker and Constable Clay Woods were in the Sullivans’ home where they found Sophia Sullivan’s body. The son was still inside the neighbor’s home when he told the neighbors that his father had killed his mother, the release stated.Sullivan’s son, on three separate occasions, identified his father as the one who killed his mother and the Jeff Davis County Sheriff’s Office obtained an arrest warrant for Sullivan, the release detailed.Sullivan cooperated with authorities and while at the sheriff’s office a swab of his hands was taken. The test was positive, indicating there was blood on his hands, the release stated. Sullivan also agreed to take a polygraph test, which was given Monday, and he failed the polygraph test, the release stated.Sullivan was transported to Hudspeth County Jail and bond was set at $130,000. Twitter By admin – March 20, 2018 WhatsApp Facebook Authorities arrest husband of teacher found dead in Marfa Twitter Facebook WhatsApp Previous articleFive things you need to know today, March 20Next articleCHAPMAN: A weakling masquerading as a tough guy adminlast_img read more

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‘State Using Iron Hand To Curb Free Speech’: Justice Lokur Expresses Concerns Over Use Of Sedition Laws, UAPA

first_imgTop Stories’State Using Iron Hand To Curb Free Speech’: Justice Lokur Expresses Concerns Over Use Of Sedition Laws, UAPA LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK14 Sep 2020 12:02 AMShare This – xExpressing serious concerns over the rampant use of sedition laws, Unlawful Activities Prevention Act(UAPA), and preventive detention against people for expressing dissent, Justice (Retd) Madan B Lokur, former judge of the Supreme Court, said, “State is using an iron hand to curb free speech”.The judge was addressing a virtual discussion on “Freedom of speech and judiciary” organized by…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginExpressing serious concerns over the rampant use of sedition laws, Unlawful Activities Prevention Act(UAPA), and preventive detention against people for expressing dissent, Justice (Retd) Madan B Lokur, former judge of the Supreme Court, said, “State is using an iron hand to curb free speech”.The judge was addressing a virtual discussion on “Freedom of speech and judiciary” organized by Campaign for Judicial Accountability and Reforms (CJAR) and Swaraj Abhiyan in the context of Prashant Bhushan depositing fine of Re 1 in the contempt case.”Suddenly you have a lot of cases charging people with sedition. Common citizens who say something are charged with sedition”, Justice Lokur said. He said that already there are nearly 70 cases of sedition this year itself. Last year, it was nearly 90, he remembered.”State is using sedition as an iron hand to curb free speech, which I think is an overreaction to people’s expression of opinion.”, he said.Apart from the use of sedition law, another method adopted by which State curbs free speech is to crack down on critical opinions by charging them as spreading fake news, Justice Lokur said. He cited the examples of journalists reporting about COVID cases, lack of ventilators, etc., being charged for spreading fake news.Another method is the misreading of the statements to attribute motives. This happened in the case of Prashant Bhushan, he said. “I believe he had no intention to break the judiciary. But his statements were misread. He was only expressing his opinion about the judiciary”, he said.Lokur further said the people are put under preventive detention by misinterpreting their speeches and by attributing motives to them.In this regard, he mentioned the case of Dr Kafeel Khan (without actually naming him) who was detained under the National Security Act over a speech made against the Citizenship Amendment Act 2019.Justice Lokur said that the Allahabad High Court quashed his detention, after observing that his speech was actually intended to promote national integration and unity. But he had to be under detention for nearly six months as a District Magistrate misinterpreted his speech.Students, activists, etc are put under jails by misreading their dissenting voices to invoke UAPA against them, he said.”On the other hand, you have people who talk about violence, about breaking up things. Nothing happens to them”, he noted.Highlighting that there are over 3.40 crore cases pending, he urged that the judiciary should “prioritize its concerns” and said that there was a need to increase transparency in the judiciary.State is using an iron hand to curb free speech. Suddenly you have a lot of cases charging people with sedition. Common citizen who say something are charged with sedition. Already 70 cases of sedition this year : Justice Madan B Lokur, retired SC judge. pic.twitter.com/JdiHVOC2U1— Live Law (@LiveLawIndia) September 14, 2020 N. Ram, senior journalist and former editor of ‘The Hindu’ and social activist Aruna Roy also spoke at the session.RTI activist Anjali Bharadwaj moderated the discussion. Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

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Bar Associations Should Desist From Taking Such Reckless & Irresponsible Decisions: BCI On P&H Bar Council’s Resolution Seeking Transfer Of Chief Justice

first_imgNews UpdatesBar Associations Should Desist From Taking Such Reckless & Irresponsible Decisions: BCI On P&H Bar Council’s Resolution Seeking Transfer Of Chief Justice LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK16 May 2021 2:08 AMShare This – xThe Bar Council of India has ratified the decision taken by its sub-committee against resolutions passed by the Punjab and Haryana High Court Bar Association seeking transfer of Chief Justice Ravi Shanker Jha. The sub-committee has also restored the membership of Advocate General Atul Nanda, who was caught in the cross fire and dismembered by the Bar Association in February this year. In doing so, it remarked, “The differences and dissatisfaction are bound to occur in every institution. But, the issues can be resolved amicably through talks and discussions; And if an issue is not resolved at the level of any Bar Association, the matter should be reported to the concerned State Bar Council. There is no reason that the persons sitting at the top of the system will not listen to the cause of the Advocates and will not fix a time for meeting with the representatives of the Bar and/or will not consider the genuine concerns of the Bar. Such guidelines are to be followed by all the Bar Associations.” Background In February 20201, the Punjab and Haryana High Court Bar Association had passed a resolution seeking transfer of Chief Justice Ravi Shanker Jha, citing continuous closure of the High Court and consequent denial of justice. Through the said resolution, the Association had also removed Advocate General Atul Nanda as a member for allegedly acting against the interest of the Bar and working against physical hearings. The said resolution was stayed by the State Bar Council as arbitrary and in violation of Rule-10 and 11 of the Rules of High Court Bar Association. Subsequently, on May 7, the Association once again passed a resolution for transfer of Justice Jha, alleging that he has not co-operated with the Bar and has taken least interest in the problems faced by the general public. The said resolution was also stayed by the State Bar Council as “wholly unjustified and uncalled for”. Thereafter, the Bar Association approached the Bar Council of India by filing a revision-cum-stay petition against the order of stay passed by the Bar Council of Punjab and Haryana. Findings The sub-committee of BCI said that in this period of crisis, all the stakeholders of the legal institution should stand united, have free flowing channels of communication so that the dignity of the institution as a whole, is maintained. It noted that steps had already been taken on the administrative side of the Punjab and Haryana High Court to optimize the working of Courts through Video Conferencing. It further noted that the High Court has already allowed Anticipatory Bails, Habeas Corpus Petitions and Protection matters to be listed without mentioning and an assurance was given to the Association to consider feasible demands made by it. The Committee while appreciating the above noted steps suggested that as and when the situation in relation to COVID-19 eases out, there shall be further deliberations between the Chief Justice and the President/ Hony Secretary of the Punjab and Haryana High Court Bar Association so that measures feasible and suitable can be taken. The Committee also mentioned about the Resolution passed by the High Court Bar Association in February and said, “Such resolutions to remove the membership of any Advocate from any Bar Association in such manner is not only mala-fide, but, may also invite disciplinary action against the office bearers.” It noted that on many occasions Mr. Atul Nanda, Advocate General, Punjab had publicly expressed his support for physical hearing of the Court and had also given his written consent for resumption of physical hearings before the Administrative Committee of the High Court. Thus, in the opinion of the Bar Council of India, Mr. Atul Nanda, Advocate General, Punjab has always played a very exemplary and appreciable role. “He is a seasoned Senior Advocate. Such persons are infact pride of any Bar Association. The membership of Mr. Atul Nanda is hereby restored. He shall continue to be the Member of Punjab and Haryana High Court Bar Association,” the BCI sub-committee said. It added that a bare perusal of the February resolution makes it amply clear that such resolutions have no leg to stand on, rather, the Bar Association should desist from taking such reckless and irresponsible decisions. “Unless there are strong compelling circumstances any Bar Association cannot lay any undue pressure on any of its Member/s to do a particular thing against his wishes,” it said. The matter was closed on noting that the Association has itself withdrawn its Resolutions and that nothing in the dispute remains pending. Click Here To Download Resolution Read ResolutionTagsBar Council of India Punjab & Haryana High Court Bar Association Arbitrary Listing of Cases Online Mentioning Chief Justice Ravi Shanker Jha Next Storylast_img read more

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Stark warning over the future of retirement

first_img Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article Company pension schemes are becoming increasingly unaffordable as peoplelive longer and retire earlier, according to the new chairman of the NationalAssociation of Pension Funds. Peter Thompson told the NAPF’s annual conference in Birmingham last weekthat many firms are closing their defined benefit schemes to new entrantsbecause of rising projected costs. He said the ramifications of increasing longevity will affect employers andscheme members as well as the economy and the attitudes and beliefs of society.Thompson said, “There is a dichotomy here – a discontinuity between onthe one hand an increasing life expectancy and on the other a reducing workinglife. “It is neither logical nor reasonable to suppose the discontinuity cancontinue and indeed, become greater indefinitely. “The retired part of our lives cannot continue to expand apparentlywithout limit, while the working part stays the same or reduces – not if weexpect to continue to enjoy a reasonable standard of living inretirement.” Thompson, a partner at consultancy William M Mercer, called for a completereview of what is meant by retirement to ensure pensions can continue toprovide a decent standard of living. He added, “What is needed is a fundamental review of what we mean byretirement and what we mean by work in an era when flexible working and so onare likely to become more common. “It demands an acceptance by all of us and by the Government and itsagencies of a blurring of the edges between paid employment and other forms ofwork, and the need to modify our present systems and approaches to reflect thechanging workplace.” www.napf.co.ukBy Ben Willmott Stark warning over the future of retirementOn 30 May 2001 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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Multipoint study of a substorm on February 9, 1995

first_imgAn extended interval of strong northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) was observed by the Wind spacecraft located at an upstream distance of ∼193 RE from February 8–10, 1995, with a brief break of southward IMF from 0200 to 0400 UT on February 9. This brief interval of southward IMF led to an isolated substorm of moderate intensity (∼500 nT) with expansion phase starting at ∼0431 UT. This substorm may be triggered by the northward turning of the IMF since its onset time matched well with the time expected for the arrival of the northward turning of the IMF at Earth. The substorm activities were monitored by 11 spacecraft in space (Wind, IMP 8, Geotail, six geosynchronous satellites, one DMSP satellite, and Freja) and two networks of ground stations (Canopus and SuperDARN) covering both the northern and southern hemispheres. The extensive coverage of this event provides us with results (1) showing some unusual characteristics possibly related to the isolated nature of the substorm and (2) revealing some surprising features difficult to reconcile with the traditional substorm model. In the first category is unusually long duration of the growth phase and the long time delay between substorm expansion onset and particle injection onset at the geosynchronous orbit. In the second category is new evidence for multiple particle acceleration sites during substorm expansion and for sunward flow during the late expansion phase of a substorm being unrelated to a single acceleration site (X line) moving from the near-Earth tail to the more distant tail. We also present observations which show the possible optical signature on the ground of bursty bulk flows in the magnetotail.last_img read more